Cart

The Hunt for Red October PDF, ePub eBook


Hot Best Seller
Title: The Hunt for Red October
Author: Tom Clancy
Publisher: Published October 15th 1999 by Berkley Trade (first published October 28th 1984)
ISBN: 9780425172902
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

19691.The_Hunt_for_Red_October.pdf

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions


reward
How to download?
FREE registration for 1 month TRIAL Account.
DOWNLOAD as many books as you like (Personal use).
CANCEL the membership at ANY TIME if not satisfied.
Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers.


Here is the runaway bestseller that launched Tom Clancy's phenomenal career. A military thriller so gripping in its action and so convincing in its accuracy that the author was rumored to have been debriefed by the White House. Its theme: the greatest espionage coup in history. Its story: the chase for a top secret Russian missile sub. Lauded by the Washington Post as "bre Here is the runaway bestseller that launched Tom Clancy's phenomenal career. A military thriller so gripping in its action and so convincing in its accuracy that the author was rumored to have been debriefed by the White House. Its theme: the greatest espionage coup in history. Its story: the chase for a top secret Russian missile sub. Lauded by the Washington Post as "breathlessly exciting." The Hunt for Red October remains a masterpiece of military fiction by one of the world's most popular authors, a man whose shockingly realistic scenarios continue to hold us in thrall.Somewhere under the Atlantic, a Soviet sub commander has just made a fateful decision. The Red October is heading west. The Americans want her. The Russians want her back. And the most incredible chase in history is on...

30 review for The Hunt for Red October

  1. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    At the tail end of the Cold War, Captain Marko Ramius of the Soviet Navy decides to defect , incredibly planning to bring the most advanced submarine in the world with him.The Red October has a new drive system that is virtually noiseless.The nuclear vessel would be almost undetectable, a great advantage against the U.S. and its Allies, but the charismatic Ramius is a bitter man.The widower, and half Lithuanian blames the Soviet Union for the botched operation that killed his beloved wife.He has At the tail end of the Cold War, Captain Marko Ramius of the Soviet Navy decides to defect , incredibly planning to bring the most advanced submarine in the world with him.The Red October has a new drive system that is virtually noiseless.The nuclear vessel would be almost undetectable, a great advantage against the U.S. and its Allies, but the charismatic Ramius is a bitter man.The widower, and half Lithuanian blames the Soviet Union for the botched operation that killed his beloved wife.He has recruited unmarried and loyal officers to follow his orders.Telling the rest of the crew that they're going on a friendship visit to Cuba! Leaving from a frozen Arctic port in early December, he needs an icebreaker to get to the open gray sea.The commanding captain looking back at the coast with a touch of melancholy, for the last time.The chilly wind makes everyone outside uncomfortable from northern Russia,The Red October, heads west to the American dominated Atlantic Ocean. Underwater the giant boat travels slowly with 115 crewmen and 15 officers, they are soon hunted by the Soviets. Ships from above and below the seas and planes from the skies, all want to capture or destroy the renegade sub. The KGB man aboard has to be neutralized, still are there others? Back at the C.I.A. headquarters in the suburbs of Washington, Jack Ryan receives information , clandestine pictures of the new Soviet submarine, the puzzling photos baffle the uneasy experts. A dangerous development in the balance of power, between the two superpowers...And the northern Soviet Fleet is on the high seas, on course to reach the eastern coast of the United States, very soon. A military exercise or War? The President has a mission for the spy agency's analyst, become a secret agent , Ryan is not happy...would you...Exciting cat and mouse scenes among Soviet, American and British airplanes, ships and submarines.The final underwater battle is a particularly great page- turner, no exaggeration, if you get seasick reading Moby Dick, or a little claustrophobic not recommended for you.....Otherwise superb adventures under the sea...Sounds a bit like Jules Verne doesn't it...And what's wrong with that !

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Meredith

    After reading Fifty Shades of Girl Smut, I think I need a manly book. The Hunt for Red October seems virile enough. Strong sweaty men...at sea...with not a woman in sight. Wait a sec! What am I getting in to? They better not start singing, "In the Navy" or "Y.M.C.A." And if there's even a single fashion tip, I'm tossing this book! Wow, what a wonderful book. This is number two on my Clancy book list, right behind Red Storm Rising.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    I read this when I was on the USS Eisenhower. It was so popular with the Squids that I think it replaced the BMR. The thing that really impressed everyone on the ship was how accurate Clancy was with both his research and his story-telling. There was never a "that's not how it happens" moment, so common in media of this type. Engaging story, meticulous research combine for a fantastic read. I recommend this one to everyone.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Beata

    Tom Clancy is not my favourite writer but for mysterious reasons I have always been into reading books on submarine theme so did not miss out on The Hunt for Red October and enjoyed it thoroughly.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    Writer’s style is not engaging or entertaining for me. He’s probably good for military technical buffs. This guy is a popular best selling author. But not for me. I assume his fans are those who love to think and talk about military technical stuff - with a story to go along with it. The author is regularly welcomed aboard jets, submarines, and destroyers. Admirals and generals give him access, Pentagon officials debrief him, and many of his books are required reading at military colleges. So I a Writer’s style is not engaging or entertaining for me. He’s probably good for military technical buffs. This guy is a popular best selling author. But not for me. I assume his fans are those who love to think and talk about military technical stuff - with a story to go along with it. The author is regularly welcomed aboard jets, submarines, and destroyers. Admirals and generals give him access, Pentagon officials debrief him, and many of his books are required reading at military colleges. So I assume he is accurate about these things. MY PROBLEMS: There were too many characters to keep track of. And for each character, I only knew them through their work. There was no emotional development of characters, no seeing their feelings. I felt like this was “bring your daughter to work day,” and I was going along with my dad (and many other dads) listening and watching as they did their work and attended meetings. I wasn’t excited about anything. Parts were boring. I listened to the sonar guy for a while, then I listened to the captain of a ship for a while, then I listened to the Russian leaders meet and talk about what to do, then I listened to the CIA meet and talk about what to do, then a guy calls another guy talking about what to do. Throughout the book the reader is jumping around among different groups of military and political people. I want interesting characters to watch, characters that pull me in emotionally. I want witty, interesting, or enlightening dialogue. I want interesting events that move the plot along. There were two interesting major climactic resolutions, but it took way too long to get to them, with nothing else good along the way. It was just watch the guys work. My mind wandered too often, and I wished it would be over. I saw the movie many years ago and loved it. The movie had a very different feel, and it ended sooner than the book. I think the movie was one of those “inspired by” movies rather than “based on” the book. In the BOOK Jack and other U.S. leaders all believe Marco (the captain of the RO) wants to defect, and they have a plan and prepare for it. In the MOVIE, Jack believes Marco wants to defect but another US commander doesn’t. The commander plans to blow up the RO, and Jack has to convince him not to. At one point Jack lies to the US commander saying I know Marco so well that I know he will turn left at the next something. Jack was bluffing. But when Marco coincidentally turned left, the US commander cancels the order to attack. That scene was so intense that I still remember it all these years later. Nothing like that was in the book. Anyway I wanted to try Tom Clancy, which is why I read this, but I won’t be reading any more. STORY BRIEF: The book is set around 1983, during the days of the “Cold War” between the U.S. and the USSR. It illustrates some of the thinking back then with nuclear threats on both sides. This is one of many books in the Jack Ryan series. Jack is an analyst for the CIA. The Red October is the name of a Russian submarine. The captain of the RO does not follow orders and is on the run from other USSR subs and ships. Jack is the first one to suggest the captain might want to defect. The U.S. navy and the Russian fleet are all trying to find the RO. NARRATOR: The narrator J. Charles spoke too quickly. It was jarring to concentrate on his speed of talking. Even between scenes and chapters there were almost no pauses. DATA: Unabridged audiobook reading time: 16 hrs and 47 mins. Swearing language: strong, including religious swear words. Sexual content: none. Setting: Around 1983 U.S., USSR (Russia), and the Atlantic Ocean. Book copyright: 1984. Genre: military historical fiction. Ending: happy for the good guys.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Loretta

    Wow! I didn't expect to like this book, at all. So out of my comfort zone, I can't tell you! But since I'm trying to read books off The Great American Read list I decided to give this book a try. So happy I did! So thrilling and suspenseful, it really kept me on the edge of my seat! I've got to hand it to The Great American Read! They have books on their list for people to read that they normally wouldn't pick up. So thanks for that because I would have missed out on a really good thrilling and Wow! I didn't expect to like this book, at all. So out of my comfort zone, I can't tell you! But since I'm trying to read books off The Great American Read list I decided to give this book a try. So happy I did! So thrilling and suspenseful, it really kept me on the edge of my seat! I've got to hand it to The Great American Read! They have books on their list for people to read that they normally wouldn't pick up. So thanks for that because I would have missed out on a really good thrilling and suspenseful book! 😊

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    A Cold War book that aged very well. Still, a bit of great American prosperity and "our enlisted men are more skilled than their officers" theme running through the book. A Soviet sub captain makes plans to defect to the US along with his hand-picked officers. He is in the newest and most advanced Soviet submarine that can run almost silent. It is discovered by Petty Officer Jones (our enlisted guy). It's not a thrilling page-turner but a more political chess game between the superpowers and the A Cold War book that aged very well. Still, a bit of great American prosperity and "our enlisted men are more skilled than their officers" theme running through the book. A Soviet sub captain makes plans to defect to the US along with his hand-picked officers. He is in the newest and most advanced Soviet submarine that can run almost silent. It is discovered by Petty Officer Jones (our enlisted guy). It's not a thrilling page-turner but a more political chess game between the superpowers and their men. Although the world's three most powerful navies are involved, the military damage is minimal. The Cold War was cold and diplomacy, technology, and behind the scenes maneuvering were the norm. Clancy captured an era with this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    P. Lundburg

    In my opinion, this is Clancy's best book, even beyond the Jack Ryan stories. The depth of character coupled with the suspense of an underwater attack submarine chase makes this book so memorable that I read it a second time just to enjoy it again. The plotting is fantastic, but I have to say that it's the way Clancy crawls into the mind of a troubled Soviet sub captain that makes this story so rich for me. We get such a complete picture of the history and psyche of Capt. Ramius that we not only In my opinion, this is Clancy's best book, even beyond the Jack Ryan stories. The depth of character coupled with the suspense of an underwater attack submarine chase makes this book so memorable that I read it a second time just to enjoy it again. The plotting is fantastic, but I have to say that it's the way Clancy crawls into the mind of a troubled Soviet sub captain that makes this story so rich for me. We get such a complete picture of the history and psyche of Capt. Ramius that we not only understand the complexity of what he's doing, but feel genuine and complete empathy for him in his plight. All of this is done through the action. Not a moment of suspense is paused while we get Ramius' plight and his desire. The intensity of the onboard and offboard politics is fantastic, and very believable. Great book, and highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Everyone always goes on about how meticulous Tom Clancy's background research is, but there was a moment in this book which made me wonder. They're going to run a big program on a military computer, and (being gamblin' military men) they decide to bet on how long it will take to complete. One of them asks how long the program is - number of lines, or punched cards, or whatever. The other one tells him, and then the first guy makes his estimate. I'm sorry, this no doubt shows what a mean-spirited Everyone always goes on about how meticulous Tom Clancy's background research is, but there was a moment in this book which made me wonder. They're going to run a big program on a military computer, and (being gamblin' military men) they decide to bet on how long it will take to complete. One of them asks how long the program is - number of lines, or punched cards, or whatever. The other one tells him, and then the first guy makes his estimate. I'm sorry, this no doubt shows what a mean-spirited person I am, but it did cross my mind to wonder if Mr. Clancy knew what a loop was. I'm ashamed of myself. I'm sure there's any number of perfectly reasonable explanations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Yes, I may be fashionably late to this party, considering the threat of war between Soviet Russia -- which doesn't exist anymore -- and Imperialist America is a major theme of this novel. But I figured this should be my first experience with Tom Clancy, and I do not regret my decision at all. This is a near-perfect political thriller, juggling a dozen major characters on two continents as well as a myriad number of ships -- both on and under the Atlantic Ocean. While it was a bit tricky keeping Yes, I may be fashionably late to this party, considering the threat of war between Soviet Russia -- which doesn't exist anymore -- and Imperialist America is a major theme of this novel. But I figured this should be my first experience with Tom Clancy, and I do not regret my decision at all. This is a near-perfect political thriller, juggling a dozen major characters on two continents as well as a myriad number of ships -- both on and under the Atlantic Ocean. While it was a bit tricky keeping track of everything at a few points, the minor confusion was well worth the scope of what Clancy achieved. I also loved how I was fooled into thinking a later plot event was a rather weak climax, only to not have yet reached the true climax, which does not disappoint at all (view spoiler)[Underwater submarine torpedo battle! (hide spoiler)] . As a side note, when they wanted to make a movie out of this board game: All they had to do was adapt this book again, instead of doing this: But I guess that would have been too easy. Sigh. Update: Okay, maybe I spoke too soon about the theme of this book being outdated. What a difference a year makes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.0 stars. My first Tom Clancy novel and the one that made me an instant fan of his work. Jack Ryan is a terrific character and the plot was very well done. Highly recommended for fans of political thrillers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    The very first in a ridiculously successful series of thrillers and not surprising, since it is an incredibly effective suspense story. Or at least I think it is. I haven't read the early Clancy books in many years and frankly, I'm very afraid to. I remember the bloated cheap hardback editions (that still weigh down my bookshelves at home) as almost un-put-downable rollercoaster adventures. What I'm unsure of is if my taste in reading have shifted fundamentally or if Clancy's books took a horrib The very first in a ridiculously successful series of thrillers and not surprising, since it is an incredibly effective suspense story. Or at least I think it is. I haven't read the early Clancy books in many years and frankly, I'm very afraid to. I remember the bloated cheap hardback editions (that still weigh down my bookshelves at home) as almost un-put-downable rollercoaster adventures. What I'm unsure of is if my taste in reading have shifted fundamentally or if Clancy's books took a horrible nosedive around or with Rainbow Six or so? Since I'm still able to enjoy the odd Alistair MacLean and Robert Ludlum (even if, in all honesty, it's been a while for those too), I'm holding out hope that this and The Cardinal of the Kremlin and others really are as good as I remember). But I'm not sure if I'll ever wage that Schrödinger's Cat-type bet and actually re-read them. I loved the movie based on this btw, but that had Sean Connery, and that's like cheating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vedran Karlić

    Uh. Bio sam između tri i četiri, no na kraju sam odlučio knjizi dati veću ocjenu. Razlog tome je taj što kada je dobra, onda je zbilja napeta i uzbudljiva, no u dobrom djelu nije takva (barem meni nije bila). Ima više razloga za to, a jedan od glavnih je taj što je čitam danas, a ne u vrijeme kada je napisana. Da se razumijemo, mogu potpuno shvatiti taj kontekst u kojem su dvije suprotstavljene strane postavljene totalno crno i bijelo, no taj period mi je dosta stran. Mogu zamisliti koliko je bil Uh. Bio sam između tri i četiri, no na kraju sam odlučio knjizi dati veću ocjenu. Razlog tome je taj što kada je dobra, onda je zbilja napeta i uzbudljiva, no u dobrom djelu nije takva (barem meni nije bila). Ima više razloga za to, a jedan od glavnih je taj što je čitam danas, a ne u vrijeme kada je napisana. Da se razumijemo, mogu potpuno shvatiti taj kontekst u kojem su dvije suprotstavljene strane postavljene totalno crno i bijelo, no taj period mi je dosta stran. Mogu zamisliti koliko je bilo tada, no nisam tada živio, a usprkos tenzijama koje i danas postoje, situacija se prilično promijenila. Drugi dio koji nije bio baš po mom ukusu vezan je oko vojne terminologije (i onih popratnih). Nekada je previše informacija samo previše informacija. Nisam osjećao da dobivam išta sa njima, no opet, razumijem kako je to nekome super. Ovo je čisto stvar osobnog ukusa. Nije mi žao što sam je pročitao, no dva put bih razmislio da li bih je čitao da sam znao što me čeka.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    I read this book when I was a kid before or immediately after the film. It was an exciting read and I became addicted to Clancy for a brief period before I realised how propagandistic his writing became for the military-industrial complex. Like the epic thriller with Sean Connery, this book is breathtakingly fast-paced and full of fun characters and the iconic Jack Ryan as a CIA agent. My father actually hunted Russian subs back in the 70s so he could attest to the realism of the scenario to a d I read this book when I was a kid before or immediately after the film. It was an exciting read and I became addicted to Clancy for a brief period before I realised how propagandistic his writing became for the military-industrial complex. Like the epic thriller with Sean Connery, this book is breathtakingly fast-paced and full of fun characters and the iconic Jack Ryan as a CIA agent. My father actually hunted Russian subs back in the 70s so he could attest to the realism of the scenario to a degree but particularly to the excitement during the cold war of the battle underwater. A great summer beach read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: A pretty fun spy thriller that occasionally gets bogged down by too much military jargon. Audio book: This is my first time listening to a book read by J. Charles. He's a pretty good reader. I initially felt like he read too fast, but I either got used to it, or he slowed down. He does many accents, although with multiple Russian characters, I'm not sure if he made them all sound the same, or I simply couldn't tell them apart. The book also uses sound effects to simulate phone c Executive Summary: A pretty fun spy thriller that occasionally gets bogged down by too much military jargon. Audio book: This is my first time listening to a book read by J. Charles. He's a pretty good reader. I initially felt like he read too fast, but I either got used to it, or he slowed down. He does many accents, although with multiple Russian characters, I'm not sure if he made them all sound the same, or I simply couldn't tell them apart. The book also uses sound effects to simulate phone calls and radio talk on the ships/submarines that I thought was well done. All and all I think the audiobook edition adds something extra to the story. Full Review This is my first time reading this book. I had previously seen and enjoyed the movie. It's been awhile so I have a hard time comparing the two. I might have slightly enjoyed the movie more however. There are a few parts of this book that seemed to get bogged down with too much military jargon and side antidotes that I don't think always added much to the main story. The main story however is a lot of fun though. There is a reason why several of Mr. Clancy's Jack Ryan books have been turned into movies. He does a great job writing a fast pace spy novel that translates well to a big screen. It doesn't seem like they had to do too much to the story to make a good movie out of it. This isn't a book for great character depth or intricate subplots, but was the perfect choice as a palette cleanser from the last book I listened to. Most people are probably familiar with Tom Clancy and most likely Jack Ryan. He's not really a gun-toting action hero, but an intelligent analyst able to out think his enemies. I plan to continue on in the series (in publication order rather than chronological order) at some point, especially if I can get a hold of them in audiobook for cheap or from the library. 3.5 Stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    L.M. Mountford

    Could not finish. This was my second try at reading a Tom Clancy and this was even more disappointing than the first. I suppose if I was an American and this was the height of the cold war, I might think differently but it's not the 80s and I am English, so too bad. This read like a propaganda novel, describing the Soviets as backwards and unreliable, belittling the 'Brits', and always emphasising American superiority. I won't deny it started off well, but then it got dull and i spent a lot of ti Could not finish. This was my second try at reading a Tom Clancy and this was even more disappointing than the first. I suppose if I was an American and this was the height of the cold war, I might think differently but it's not the 80s and I am English, so too bad. This read like a propaganda novel, describing the Soviets as backwards and unreliable, belittling the 'Brits', and always emphasising American superiority. I won't deny it started off well, but then it got dull and i spent a lot of time just waiting for something to happen, and when something did happen, Clancy revealed it two pages before. If you're considering reading this, just watch the movie.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ☼♄Jülie 

    This was a fantastic story, one of my all time favourites. All in the Jack Ryan series are great. This one was made into a movie which was also very good.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Action-packed and exciting, this book was rather difficult to follow at times but otherwise was really gripping and intriguing, with vivid descriptions and interesting characters.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Scott Olson

    Thirty years on, this classic still works. The technology has become dated, but the themes are timeless. A great read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hunter

    The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy Tom Clancy explains just how dangerous it must be to work on a submarine. The better half of this story takes place in the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between North America and Europe, in the 1980s. CIA agent, Jack Ryan finds out just how hard it is to find a submarine that appears to fool even the best sonar men. Jack Ryan is one of the main characters that I liked in this story. He is a persistent human being in that he is unwilling to give up without capturin The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy Tom Clancy explains just how dangerous it must be to work on a submarine. The better half of this story takes place in the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between North America and Europe, in the 1980s. CIA agent, Jack Ryan finds out just how hard it is to find a submarine that appears to fool even the best sonar men. Jack Ryan is one of the main characters that I liked in this story. He is a persistent human being in that he is unwilling to give up without capturing the Red October. He is the main reason I liked the book. He is a very interesting character because he is extremely motivated to find the Red October and is always taking action, which often leads to conflict. Marco Ramius is the captain of the elusive Red October. He wishes to defect because he feels that the United States of America holds more for him than Russia ever will. Since Marco Ramius’ wife died the preceding year, he has no family left in Russia so therefore he has nothing to lose by defecting. In Russia, Ramius had never experienced freedom, which is another reason he wishes to become a United States citizen. Jack Ryan trails Marco Ramius for countless miles. Skip Tyler, an expert when it comes to submarines and a good friend of Jack Ryan, helps the CIA find out what they are up against when they receive pictures of a new Typhoon class Russian Submarine. Skip Tyler is able to figure out what makes this new submarine so silent. Almost the whole time during the story, the Red October is being closely pursued or attacked. The Hunt for Red October takes place in the 1980s, nearly 30 years ago, but the writer makes it seem so real that the reader feels as if the story is happening in the present day. The main theme of this book is that teamwork is important. Marco Ramius and Jack Ryan later find out that by working together, more can be accomplished than working by themselves. This whole story is based around the simple want for freedom, the desire to live and do as you please. Freedom is something that should be given to everyone. Will Marco Ramius achieve his freedom by coming to America? Will he be destroyed by his enemies, or maybe even his own allies? If you want to find the answer to these questions, you will have to read the book. Page Count: 469 Genre: Espionage

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    Damn, Marko Ramius is an awesome character. Just sayin'. Real review: Well, I've finally read a Clancy book. Yay me? It reminded me a bit of the Honor Harrington series, which I guess makes sense. They're both military, after all; one has spaceships and the other has submarines and other than that the genre conventions seemed about the same. AND THEY BOTH HAVE ONE REALLY ANNOYING HABIT: The 'action action action loooooongwiiiiiinded descriiiiiiption of teeeeechnoooology' format. If I'd been paying a Damn, Marko Ramius is an awesome character. Just sayin'. Real review: Well, I've finally read a Clancy book. Yay me? It reminded me a bit of the Honor Harrington series, which I guess makes sense. They're both military, after all; one has spaceships and the other has submarines and other than that the genre conventions seemed about the same. AND THEY BOTH HAVE ONE REALLY ANNOYING HABIT: The 'action action action loooooongwiiiiiinded descriiiiiiption of teeeeechnoooology' format. If I'd been paying attention instead of trying not to fall asleep in those bits I would have learned more about submarines than I ever wanted to know. As it was, I kinda skipped those bits. Plot-wise, there's a lot of buildup. Like most of the book. And while it's interesting and yes, it's necessary, there are so many threads and they were disconnected for so long that I lost track of them. Clearly, Clancy is not an 'in late out early' sort of writer. Or maybe this is a first book thing? I don't think I'd classify this as a thriller of any sort, because it was never really thrilling. Is it a spoiler to say that of course they got the Red October away safely and no one knew? Frankly, I don't think so. I mean, if they failed there would have been no book and if the Russians had found out Clancy would have had to turn this into a series. Since neither of these things are true, the operations must have been a success. Simple logical deduction. So this isn't a book that you want to read to find out what happened so much as how it happened, and at that Clancy excels. I'm obviously not a submariner, but this has been well-recieved by the navy and certainly seemed meticulously researched. Clancy is now on my radar (ahem, pun?) enough that I'll read more of his work later. I'm in no big rush, though. Also, this book was difficult for me to get through and I don't need another millstone novel to slow me down reading everything else.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

    Probably my favorite Tom Clancy novel, and certainly my favorite on submarine warfare, this book introduces Jack Ryan as a young and bright CIA analyst faced with a politically explosive situation. Realistic politics, thrilling submarine chases and battles, and believable characters make this come together well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    The beginning of the book is so bogged down with details that it's quite painful to read; however all of that is made up by a blockbuster of an ending.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Didham

    The Hunt for Red October The Hunt for Red October is a thrill ride you won't want to miss from start to finish the plot keeps you guessing. Why is he doing this? What is his motive? Tom Clancy's unique writing style ties everything together. From engaging characters to an intriguing plot for me it was a must read. The year is 1984, A russian nuclear submarine is steaming to the united states the Americans what her the russians want her back. Could this mean war or is it trying to defect? The Re The Hunt for Red October The Hunt for Red October is a thrill ride you won't want to miss from start to finish the plot keeps you guessing. Why is he doing this? What is his motive? Tom Clancy's unique writing style ties everything together. From engaging characters to an intriguing plot for me it was a must read. The year is 1984, A russian nuclear submarine is steaming to the united states the Americans what her the russians want her back. Could this mean war or is it trying to defect? The Red October was the pride of the soviet navy, designed and commanded by Marko Ramius a captain of the first rank. A trusted party member who has gone rogue and is trying to defect to the United States of America but, Its more complicated than it seems. Ramius father was a hero of the revolution but, to Ramius his father was hardly a hero. For Ramius the state had robbed him of his father that was not the only thing the state would rob him of. On the other side of the iron gate lies CIA analyst Jack Ryan a modest man who speaks his mind. By determination, luck and skill he rose through the ranks of the CIA and now is one of their most trusted analyst. He has the knowledge and the willpower to get the job done. Marko Ramius once a proud loyal soviet who would do anything for the cause. A son of a party chieftain his father was a hero of the revolution but, Ramius had little in common with his father. One thing he learned as a young man was that the state had been corrupted, his old mentor the man that taught him about submarines a good man had died because he had no place to live. Later on his wife would die because, the state had inadequate doctor with poor training. Also Ramius would learn there was nothing he could do. This lead to hate and over time his hate manifested itself into an idea then a plain. A last revenge on the state that had taken so much from him and giving so little yes for Marko Ramius it was the only way. Tom clancy does a great job at making Marko Ramius a likable believable character. This man motivated by revenge trying to escape from tyranny to freedom. Has plenty of obstacles to overcome on his journey, that shows exactly what kind of person he is. You see this near the end of the book when its all over Ramius is empty not happy not sad. He had his revenge but in the end it didn't make him happier. The Hunt for Red October is a perfect example of what was going on during the cold war. People were defecting, also this shows how corrupt communism was. How it favored the few and enslaved the masses. Tom Clancy showed this point in a easy to grasp way through an exciting novel. Still the underlying theme that was shown in the book is revenge doesn't pay, after all Marko Ramius did he felt empty after it was all done.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eric Jonrosh

    What's more Russian than a Scotsman? I first discovered “The Hunt for Red October” when the late, great Tom Clancy, informed me that the source material would be converted to film in the summer of ’89. When he explained that none other than Sir Sean Connery would play a crucial part, I immediately grew red in the face and hurled my glass of scotch into the fire quite dramatically. Regretting that impulsive act, I poured myself another glass, much larger than the first. When Tom inquired why I rea What's more Russian than a Scotsman? I first discovered “The Hunt for Red October” when the late, great Tom Clancy, informed me that the source material would be converted to film in the summer of ’89. When he explained that none other than Sir Sean Connery would play a crucial part, I immediately grew red in the face and hurled my glass of scotch into the fire quite dramatically. Regretting that impulsive act, I poured myself another glass, much larger than the first. When Tom inquired why I reacted so violently, I hurled that glass into the fire as well. Sit back, dear readers, and prepare to be aroused and astounded. When I first met my ancient nemesis Sean Connery, we were working together on a film called “The Highlander.” I was of a particular help because I’d written a poem in 1965 about a Scottish man trapped in the body of a Portuguese sailor. It won no great accolades, mostly because one couldn’t read it without weeping uncontrollably. After we wrapped each night on the Isle of Skye, Christopher Lambert, Sean and myself would go down to a local public house called The Sheep’s Shaft and drink scotch, sometimes for days at a time. It was disastrous for the production, but a proper scotch diet tends to break a few eggs. Then one fateful night, Sir Connery became my eternal nemesis forever. I couldn’t say what happened for certain, but I awoke the next morn, fully clothed at the rail station with a frightening message scrawled on the palm of my hand: “Show your leathery face on the moors of Scotland again, Eric Jonrosh, and I’ll cask your headless corpse in a Scotch barrel. Warmest Regards, Sean Connery” As delicious as that might sound, I took heed of the threat and never returned to that peaty bog of a country. Now I am forced to buy my scotch by the can. So it stands to reason that Mr. Connery would make a perfect Russian turncoat submarine captain. And I daresay he nailed the performance in “The Hunt for Red October.” I imagine he just played himself. Likely because he couldn’t conjure a Russian accent to save his malty skin. He would have made a fine Winston Morehouse in my retelling of the heartbreaking epic “The Spoils of Babylon,” airing on IFC this very January the 9th, 2014. Alas, Mr. Connery is approximately 900 hundred years old, so, I cast the uber-talented Marty Comanche instead. He too is now my eternal nemesis. Warmest Regards, Eric Jonrosh, spellbinding creator of “The Spoils of Babylon,” airing on IFC, January the 9th, 2014

  26. 4 out of 5

    ஐ Briansgirl (Book Sale Queen)ஐ

    This is a very good story that is incredibly researched. However, in this instance, I'd have to say the movie is better. The reason is that the movie is simplified. This is a very complex book involving military strategy. Even being a ten year veteran of our armed forces, and familiar with military language and acroynms, I found this book slow to read. The author did extensive research into soviet and allied submarines in particular, but also all naval vessels and even aircraft. He receits speci This is a very good story that is incredibly researched. However, in this instance, I'd have to say the movie is better. The reason is that the movie is simplified. This is a very complex book involving military strategy. Even being a ten year veteran of our armed forces, and familiar with military language and acroynms, I found this book slow to read. The author did extensive research into soviet and allied submarines in particular, but also all naval vessels and even aircraft. He receits specifications frequently throughout the book. It's not out of place or inappropriate, but it's not easy for the average civilian reader to follow at times. The movie simplified this. I choose this Clancy novel to start with as I loved the movie. But after taking two weeks to read this, I'll have to decide if I want to read any others. I'm curious to follow Jack Ryan's career, but doubt I could get through all 12 or 14 books in this series. (Check wikipedia for the list of related books that follow Jack Ryan's career.)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I read all but a couple of Clancy's Ryan/Clark books and find them good in the extreme. I do prefer Vince Flynn and Brad Thor, but they're somewhat different (well their characters are closer to Clark than Ryan). In this one Ryan still hasn't actually started his political career... But he does get drawn into the danger, again. Jack (an annalist for the CIA)manages to get tagged to fly photos to the UK...from there he ends trying to convince the powers in charge that a Russian sub captain is tryi I read all but a couple of Clancy's Ryan/Clark books and find them good in the extreme. I do prefer Vince Flynn and Brad Thor, but they're somewhat different (well their characters are closer to Clark than Ryan). In this one Ryan still hasn't actually started his political career... But he does get drawn into the danger, again. Jack (an annalist for the CIA)manages to get tagged to fly photos to the UK...from there he ends trying to convince the powers in charge that a Russian sub captain is trying to defect, not get close enough to the US (with the revolutionary new quiet drive Soviet sub) to launch an attack on the country. High level attitude? Sink the sub... Jack needs to convince everyone otherwise. Thumbnail synopsis but...if you've managed to get by till now without seeing the movie and you're thinking of reading the book I don't want to ruin it for you. Enjoy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Otis Chandler

    I went through a big Tom Clancy phase when I was younger. I think I read them all. This was one of the best though (the move was even good). I feel like I got a really good grasp of cold war politics by reading all these books... lol.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    It was alright, rough and a bit technical. But that was just his style. The background and theme might seem outdated now, it's not really. Good news is you can enjoy this again. demonizing Russians is fashionable again. The movie was OK.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    Although it was the first of the series to be published, Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October is actually the third novel in the Jack Ryan series. It propelled Clancy, who had been an insurance salesman with only a few letters to the editor under his writing belt, to best-selling superstar. His success with military and espionage-related fiction earned him a title he does not readily accept: father of the techno-thriller. This novel, if I remember correctly, was the first work of fiction publish Although it was the first of the series to be published, Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October is actually the third novel in the Jack Ryan series. It propelled Clancy, who had been an insurance salesman with only a few letters to the editor under his writing belt, to best-selling superstar. His success with military and espionage-related fiction earned him a title he does not readily accept: father of the techno-thriller. This novel, if I remember correctly, was the first work of fiction published by the Naval Institute Press, the publishing arm of the United States Naval Institute, a civilian entity which promotes all things naval, including the study of naval history, strategy, technology, and tactics. Some of the Naval Institute Press' other books include A.D. Baker's Fleets of the World, Clay Blair, Jr.'s Silent Victory, and Norman Friedman's Desert Victory: The War for Kuwait. But considering that although Clancy's novel deals with the workings of other federal agencies such as the Central Intelligence Agency, the FBI, the National Security Agency, and both the Executive and Legislative branches, the heart of the story is a sea chase. Based loosely on a 1975 incident in which a Soviet frigate attempted to defect to the West, The Hunt for Red October tells the by-now familiar tale of how Captain First Rank Marko Ramius and a group of selected officers aboard the Soviet Navy's newest Typhoon-class SSBN (the Navy designator for a nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, or "boomer") band together to defect to the United States and hand over the Red Navy's most advanced "stealth" submarine. Ramius, you see, is motivated by one of the strongest emotions of all: the desire for revenge against the callous Soviet state. Not only for the death of his wife as a result of negligence by a well-connected surgeon, but for all the injustices he has witnessed from even his early childhood. His father, a Lithuanian communist and devoted Party apparatchik, was responsible for many deaths and unjust acts, and Marko, raised by a decent grandmother, sees both his father and the State as monsters who care for nothing but power and expansion. In this novel, set sometime in the mid-1980s, Clancy introduces us to Jack Ryan, a CIA analyst being groomed by his mentor, Admiral James Greer, for better and more crucial postings within the Agency. Now currently assigned as CIA liaison in London (which puts this novel's setting to be after the current Clancy novel Red Rabbit), it is Ryan who first hands the U.S. its first intelligence data on Red October, courtesy of the British Secret Service. The novel's focus is on Ramius' defection attempt aboard the Red October, which has been modified to use a "caterpillar" drive (described in the movie version as a "jet engine for the water") which enables a sub to glide through the ocean almost undetectably. It also deals with the Red Navy's desperate attempts to seek and destroy the defectors' submarine, and the almost equally desperate moves of an Anglo-American fleet to acquire Red October.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions



Loading...