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I'll Tell You in Person PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: I'll Tell You in Person
Author: Chloe Caldwell
Publisher: Published October 4th 2016 by Coffee House Press
ISBN: 9781566894531
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Flailing in jobs, failing at love, getting addicted and un-addicted to people, food, and drugs—I'll Tell You in Person is a disarmingly frank account of attempts at adulthood and all the less than perfect ways we get there. Caldwell has an unsparing knack for looking within and reporting back what's really there, rather than what she'd like you to see.

30 review for I'll Tell You in Person

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Diamond

    Never thought I'd miss being young, broke, and trying to find my way through this world, but damn does Caldwell make it all seem really romantic and wonderful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I don't like most personal essays because they don't feel personal enough. They skip right over the shit I actually care about. Or they have no point at all. These essays were interesting, funny, and personal - like long emails from a really close friend. It's not just a bunch of Now I'm Going To Tell You About the Time I Did Something Foolish in My 20s that Only My Mother and Perhaps My Therapist Will Give a Shit About (And the Latter Only Because I Pay Her But It's On a Sliding Scale Because I I don't like most personal essays because they don't feel personal enough. They skip right over the shit I actually care about. Or they have no point at all. These essays were interesting, funny, and personal - like long emails from a really close friend. It's not just a bunch of Now I'm Going To Tell You About the Time I Did Something Foolish in My 20s that Only My Mother and Perhaps My Therapist Will Give a Shit About (And the Latter Only Because I Pay Her But It's On a Sliding Scale Because I'm Poor Just Like You). There IS some of that though - but she pulls it off beautifully. I never once thought, "Oh my god, would you please shut the fuck up." Which is pretty much all I ever think with these things. Most of the time, I was actually thinking, "Wow, I can't believe I like this! I'm liking something! Hooray."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    "I'll Tell You in Person" is a perfect title for this quirky and fascinating book, is also a selection of Emily Books which specializes in publishing, sales, and the promotion of women's writing. Author Chloe Caldwell, now 30, recalled the decade of her 20's in these intimate confessional essays. In starting and stopping both college and various jobs, she worked in a jewelry store as a top salesperson, was befriended by a popular celebrity, visited and stayed with her brother in Berlin, and much "I'll Tell You in Person" is a perfect title for this quirky and fascinating book, is also a selection of Emily Books which specializes in publishing, sales, and the promotion of women's writing. Author Chloe Caldwell, now 30, recalled the decade of her 20's in these intimate confessional essays. In starting and stopping both college and various jobs, she worked in a jewelry store as a top salesperson, was befriended by a popular celebrity, visited and stayed with her brother in Berlin, and much more. On Martha's Vineyard, Caldwell participated in a writing residency workshop-- though it wasn't clear if she was a teacher or student. There are many quotes from other writers that have inspired her own work, some of it seemed clichéd. Caldwell certainly has her critics, she has been accused of writing TMI. It is unsettling that anyone can google her name and read the online details she has openly divulged about her sex life. In embarrassment and shame, she has warned family members not to read parts of her books. Confessional writing often goes in that direction, and it is just as easy for readers to appreciate her truth, genuine honesty, and sense of humor. * From the book... "Non-fiction tastes best with a bottle of Charles Shaw Cabernet!"... However, Caldwell is just as quick to remind her readers, despite making some very bad decisions while drinking (in her 20's) she no longer drinks alcohol. With a writer friend they discussed the subject of "crazy stories"-- that is, compelling stories that will be good and interesting in print. Unlike some of her friends, Caldwell explained she hasn't gone skydiving, been divorced, donated eggs, cut her wrists, and never had cancer or a baby. Instead, she wrote about sleeping on the floor at Penn Station, with no other place to go or stay when her ex-boyfriend didn't accept her call. * From the book... "As the cliché goes, I've always counted on either dying young or never dying at all. I've displaced my enormous anxiety onto dogs, electrical outlets, Mack trucks running me over, and, apparently essay collections.".... Caldwell's best writing wasn't about her inspiration from the essays of Miki Howland, but rather her friendship with NYC novelist Maggie Estep, who passed away February 13, 2014. "I'll Tell You in Person" is Caldwell's fourth book. ~ With thanks to the Seattle Public Library.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dae

    Relatable and a quick read, I finished it in one night. I confess I don't understand all the rave reviews here on Goodreads; I wouldn't call it a series of essays so much as a collection of anecdotes - competently written, granted, but so self-focused that I felt it was a little self-indulgent; name-dropping and reminiscing for the author's sake. It read more like journal entries for Chloe to come back to in her 40s and 50s. It didn't have a larger thematic import. I understand the essays are me Relatable and a quick read, I finished it in one night. I confess I don't understand all the rave reviews here on Goodreads; I wouldn't call it a series of essays so much as a collection of anecdotes - competently written, granted, but so self-focused that I felt it was a little self-indulgent; name-dropping and reminiscing for the author's sake. It read more like journal entries for Chloe to come back to in her 40s and 50s. It didn't have a larger thematic import. I understand the essays are meant to be a portrait of adolescence and young adulthood, a series of sketches reflecting the confusion of figuring out your identity, the difficulty of struggling to find a sense of belonging. I didn't expect her to reach any sort of conclusion but I wanted some more wisdom, more observations and insights, I suppose, less narrative.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emily Wood

    I think I read this at the exact point in my life that I needed it. I devoured this book and cried a lot and felt like I was less alone for a while. Thank you, Chloe.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    Chloe Caldwell really knows how to get a reader invested in the story and then twist the knife! I was impressed with the casual hooks she'd use to make her story accessible and when it took a turn towards surprise or heartbreak I was still right there, feeling all the feelings I'm sure she wanted me to experience. I had a great time reading/learning about her and I look forward to more memoir/nonfiction in the future!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    So fun to read these essays. Chloe Caldwell has a knack for picking out the minute details of a life that give the greater themes of her essays life and color. This feels like the older-sister companion to her first collection of essays, "Legs Get Led Astray" (which is funny, since I read the first in my earlier 20s and am reading this now, at 28) and is extremely relatable (except it sounds like Chloe's been to way cooler parties than me). Felt like getting a series of eloquent emails from a fr So fun to read these essays. Chloe Caldwell has a knack for picking out the minute details of a life that give the greater themes of her essays life and color. This feels like the older-sister companion to her first collection of essays, "Legs Get Led Astray" (which is funny, since I read the first in my earlier 20s and am reading this now, at 28) and is extremely relatable (except it sounds like Chloe's been to way cooler parties than me). Felt like getting a series of eloquent emails from a friend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie (Books and Ladders)

    Full review to come.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Two of the highest compliments I can give to a book are that they make me write, and that I recognize pieces of myself in a story about a person who is quite different from me.This book did both. Caldwell is funny, and has lived a life that is both quite ordinary and altogether memorable at the same time. About essays her Dad declares, "All essay collections should be called the same thing 'Feel Sorry For Me: I Fucked Up Eighteen Times and I'm About To Do It Again" and appropriately sometimes I t Two of the highest compliments I can give to a book are that they make me write, and that I recognize pieces of myself in a story about a person who is quite different from me.This book did both. Caldwell is funny, and has lived a life that is both quite ordinary and altogether memorable at the same time. About essays her Dad declares, "All essay collections should be called the same thing 'Feel Sorry For Me: I Fucked Up Eighteen Times and I'm About To Do It Again" and appropriately sometimes I thought things couldn't get worse for Caldwell, and then naturally they did, but with a lot of wise reflection strewn along in the wake of it. Not every essay was memorable to me, but Caldwell's personality is not one I'll forget. My favorite essays were, "Failing Singing", "Sisterless", "The Music and the Boys", and "The Girls of My Youth" but I think different ones will connect with different people, and all of them connected with me on some level.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    "I do not consider myself a political person. I never have been. A female author—I cannot remember who—once wrote something like, ‘I’m not political in my writing, why should I be? If you look at my life, I’m political in the way I live.’ It comforted me to no end. I do not watch the news. I read a little. I'm too sensitive for it and too dumb. But when I read that, I thought, Yeah! I don’t talk about women writers needing to be read, but I wrote a book that didn’t have any men in it without eve "I do not consider myself a political person. I never have been. A female author—I cannot remember who—once wrote something like, ‘I’m not political in my writing, why should I be? If you look at my life, I’m political in the way I live.’ It comforted me to no end. I do not watch the news. I read a little. I'm too sensitive for it and too dumb. But when I read that, I thought, Yeah! I don’t talk about women writers needing to be read, but I wrote a book that didn’t have any men in it without even noticing. Not tooting my own horn here, expressing my naïveté."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    "I’m also the type of person who gets mistaken for an employee no matter where I am: the Gap, a coffee shop, a bookstore, an Applebee’s. People come up to me and expect me to wait on them. 'I don’t work here,' I say. But I used to." So much good stuff. Thought-provoking, fun, relatable. I could read these all day long. A tad name-droppy at times but it doesn't spoil the 5-star rating.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna Pulley

    "We loved each other, but we loved ourselves more." What a short, sweet burst of choppy malaise, literal and figurative ecstasy, and making peace with the mundane. A great, quick read, full of heart. And drugs. But mostly heart.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cortney Cassidy

    am i the girl with the white streak in her hair and the Escher tattoo that she and her friend saw walking with a maybe girlfriend or maybe sister O_O

  14. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Peace

    Rating: 2.5 I feel bad rating this so low. It kept my attention, and Caldwell is a decent writer, but after so many stories about being wasted and/or high, having sex, and generally indulging in the wild side of youth . . . I guess I just wonder what the point of it all is? What am I supposed to gain from this? I’m not a woman in my late 20s (obviously), so maybe it’s just an inability to identify and to see romance in recklessness where others do. The writing isn’t good enough—or potent enough i Rating: 2.5 I feel bad rating this so low. It kept my attention, and Caldwell is a decent writer, but after so many stories about being wasted and/or high, having sex, and generally indulging in the wild side of youth . . . I guess I just wonder what the point of it all is? What am I supposed to gain from this? I’m not a woman in my late 20s (obviously), so maybe it’s just an inability to identify and to see romance in recklessness where others do. The writing isn’t good enough—or potent enough in its observation—to make this worthwhile, and the stories alone aren’t so interesting either. Much of it feels like a more polished blog post. That said, there are a couple of good essays here, specifically the ones about kicking a heroin addiction and the author’s friendship with Maggie Estep. I really enjoyed those.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    loooooved this it literally felt like I was just sitting with a friend listening to them ramble on about their life. The way Caldwell writes is so engaging and intriguing. Even though the essays are based around stories that have never happened to me, I found the whole thing extremely relatable and saw a lot of myself in the stories Caldwell was telling. It was raw and open and honest and I loved it

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ans

    A new favorite. Other personal essay collections pale in comparison.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Griffith

    I can't believe I read this whole horrible book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Odessa

    This book is a gospel for the mediocre and for all who look for inspiration in the department of Normcore. Rejoice! I enjoyed this title mostly because it was a quick read with occasional poignancy and laugh. The right material for your holiday chill time. The downside was that this was composed of a number of unimportant or seemingly irrelevant elements, somehow unedited and here in print. Given this is such a slim volume--only 170pages--, it might sound scandalous if I said that I was exaspera This book is a gospel for the mediocre and for all who look for inspiration in the department of Normcore. Rejoice! I enjoyed this title mostly because it was a quick read with occasional poignancy and laugh. The right material for your holiday chill time. The downside was that this was composed of a number of unimportant or seemingly irrelevant elements, somehow unedited and here in print. Given this is such a slim volume--only 170pages--, it might sound scandalous if I said that I was exasperated at times. Actually I often was. 'The Boys' in the collection was the worst torture for me in that sense. The book is on the side of overwritten/un(-der)edited, and some part remained raw material, on the 'prep notes' level. Is this what the book was supposed to be? Maybe, given the entire collection is themed, by the author's self-analysis, as confronting one's mediocrity and her late coming of age: hers came at the age thirty. People are all different. Some people claim their coming of age pushing their forty. So let's not knock her being a later bloomer. Each topic from hard drug use, divorce of her parents in her teen years, her lesbian experiment to the disrupted aspiration as a child Broadway career could be sensationalized or played out in an extreme fashion if an angle shifted, a marketing strategy changed or by a different author. Here in this collection and by the author, though, it was all monotonous, cumbersome and minimalistic, overall colloquially toned. If this was the mode the author chose in pursuit of her mediocrity or by her unchangeable voice --how about selling Cladwell as the queen of Normcore by the way--and on account of someone who chose not to fulfill her potential just as her mom dead-on-ly pointed out to her, all seemed to meet the purpose. This exasperates a reader as myself, however. The feeling of exasperation was naturally accelerated because I finally got to read the entire collection having gone great lengths. (It is a long story. I am glad I did after all, though.) Seemingly the signature parlance of the author's, disarming and candid, often worked as a double-edged sword. At times its languid pace and ignoring economy in writing became too dull and off-putting. What to write and what not to, writers, you decide, at your own risk. This basic often translates solid 'editing.' By this paramount standard in prose writing, the author came across as self-indulgent or amateurish, and not necessarily equipped with the cruelty in refining one's prose. Then, it is time the editors come in handy. I am curious of their editorial process for this book, or that book from the same line, because I was frequently baffled why the book (or that book) came out with a good amount of what could have been edited out. Publication in haste or respecting the original voices of those indie authors to be attributed to this? Ultimately a book as Caldwell's bears the impression as 'lazy,' by her own word in her interview in LARB. Or her editor's alleged via the publisher. I am sure I was less exasperated, less critical or more relaxed in star giving if these essays were blog entries or net articles. But, what does it mean anyway? Not much nowadays in our small press and normcore celebratory time, does it? While I was reading, other authors that came to mind were Kevin Sampsell and Lauren Holmes. It might be natural provided Caldwell previously published a collection from Sampsell's house and Holmes and the author having certain things in common: age range, gender, lesbian experiment, Germany, Hudson, NY, etc. albeit Caldwell is not a dog lover. In Germany is brown sugar scarce. Good info for your next Euro trip.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    You know what I like about this book? The way it's written so sporadically that it makes more sense than if it followed a set path. The way you're reading along in some whirlwind and then it all gets summed up in one sentence. It's like a release - a small epiphany. It feels right. It feels real. My favorite chapter: The Girls of My Youth The final two sentences are perfect.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    The author’s cool-girl shtick wears thin quickly and the writing fails to make even a heroin addiction seem interesting. Her essays about struggling with her sexuality and her bizarre online friendship with an unnamed Celebrity who is most definitely Lena Dunham are the bright spots in this otherwise forgettable collection.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela Gibson

    The subject matter of this memoir just wasn't for me. It might have been written well, but I couldn't get past the content.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zhanna

    Honestly I could not even finish this book. This girl needs an editor. The whole book read to me like a first draft. What was the point of any of these essays? I'm not sure even the author knows. It's not enough for things to happen to you--if you're going to write nonfiction essays, you need to think deeply about the things that happened--most importantly, meaning--or it's no different then telling your friends a story at a bar. There's an entire essay that just lists the friends she had in hig Honestly I could not even finish this book. This girl needs an editor. The whole book read to me like a first draft. What was the point of any of these essays? I'm not sure even the author knows. It's not enough for things to happen to you--if you're going to write nonfiction essays, you need to think deeply about the things that happened--most importantly, meaning--or it's no different then telling your friends a story at a bar. There's an entire essay that just lists the friends she had in high school and what bands they liked. Sorry, but why should a reader care about that? The only one I enjoyed, and probably the only reason I got this book, is the piece about her sleepover with a celebrity that seems very clearly to be Lena Dunham. But even that one left me feeling like something was missing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    lauren

    this book definitely sucked me in; I started reading it last night around 12:30 and finished it about twelve hours later. I was put off by all the adoration for Lena Dunham and the name-dropping and how she casually talks about her addiction to heroin made me feel uncomfortable for some reason. I guess I'm not saying that I didn't enjoy it because I think that I did but I feel like we are flooded with collections of personal essays and at some point they all start saying the same thing. yeah, yo this book definitely sucked me in; I started reading it last night around 12:30 and finished it about twelve hours later. I was put off by all the adoration for Lena Dunham and the name-dropping and how she casually talks about her addiction to heroin made me feel uncomfortable for some reason. I guess I'm not saying that I didn't enjoy it because I think that I did but I feel like we are flooded with collections of personal essays and at some point they all start saying the same thing. yeah, your 20s are a really weird time but what hasn't been said about them already?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yohann

    C'est intéressant de lire le journal intime de Chloé. Après "Women" qui a eu 5 étoiles - j'ai été ravi d'en savoir plus sur son histoire, et j'ai été servi. Marie a dévoré le livre en rigolant seule ! J'ai appris de nouveaux mots. Je suis impatient de lire son premier livre aussi, et le suivant ! Un livre qui va pas mal tourner dans mon cercle d'amies lyonnaises.

  25. 4 out of 5

    willowdog

    This is more of a memoir rather than essays. She relates how her 20s were drugged filled with temp jobs and how she relates to family. I could have written this. But I don’t have a following. Yes, she accepts the bisexual flag at times.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    funny, relatable, & heart breaking. Chloe brought me back to my imperfect youth and validated my uncertain present.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I enjoyed this book so much that I did a review and author interview at PANK Magazine! http://pankmagazine.com/2016/09/14/in...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    Duh.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Samuel

    I wish her writing were a little more polished and eloquent, but I loved the stories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alana Voth

    Dear peeps, This book is beautiful and boundless. You've got a friend. XO

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