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The Emerald City of Oz (1910), by L. Frank Baum and John R. Neill(illustrated)Original Version: John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Emerald City of Oz (1910), by L. Frank Baum and John R. Neill(illustrated)Original Version: John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator
Author: L. Frank Baum
Publisher: Published May 9th 2016 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (first published 1910)
ISBN: 9781533161345
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baum's fourteen Land of Oz books. It was also adapted into a Canadian animated film in 1987. Originally published on July 20, 1910, it is the story of Dorothy Gale and her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em coming to live in Oz permanently. While they are toured through the Quadling Country, the Nome King is assembling allies for an inv The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baum's fourteen Land of Oz books. It was also adapted into a Canadian animated film in 1987. Originally published on July 20, 1910, it is the story of Dorothy Gale and her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em coming to live in Oz permanently. While they are toured through the Quadling Country, the Nome King is assembling allies for an invasion of Oz. This is the first time in the Oz series that Baum made use of double plots for one of the books. Baum had intended to cease writing Oz stories with this book, but financial pressures prompted him to write and publish The Patchwork Girl of Oz, with seven other Oz books to follow.The book was dedicated to "Her Royal Highness Cynthia II of Syracuse" actually the daughter (born in the previous year, 1909) of the author's younger brother, Henry Clay "Harry" Baum.At the beginning of this story, it is made quite clear that Dorothy Gale (the primary protagonist of many of the previous Oz books), is in the habit of freely speaking of her many adventures in the Land of Oz to her only living relatives, her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry. Neither of them believes a word of her stories, but consider her a dreamer, as her dead mother had been. She is undeterred (unlike her alter ego in the film Return to Oz who is much perturbed by her guardians' doubts.) Later, it is revealed that the destruction of their farmhouse by the tornado back in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has left Uncle Henry in terrible debt. In order to pay it, he has taken out a mortgage on his farm. If he cannot repay his creditors, they will seize the farm, thus leaving Henry and his family homeless. He is not too afraid for himself, but both he and his wife, Aunt Em, fear very much for their niece's future. Upon learning this, Dorothy quickly arranges with Princess Ozma to let her bring her guardians to Oz where they will be very happier and forever safe. Using the Magic Belt (a tool captured from the jealous Nome King Roquat), Ozma transports them to her throne room. They are given rooms to live in and luxuries to enjoy, including a vast and complex wardrobe. They meet with many of Dorothy's animal friends, including the Cowardly Lion and Billina the Yellow Hen. In the underground Nome Kingdom, the Nome King, Roquat, is plotting to conquer the Land of Oz and recover his magic belt, which Dorothy took from him in Ozma of Oz. After ordering the expulsion of his General (who will not agree to such an attack) and the death of his Colonel (who also refuses), King Roquat holds counsel with a veteran soldier called Guph. Guph believes that against the many magicians of Oz (the reputation of which has grown in the telling), the Nome Army has no chance alone. He therefore sets out personally to recruit allies. John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) was a magazine and children's book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baum's, Ruth Plumly Thompson's, and three of his own.His pen-and-ink drawings have become identified almost exclusively with the Oz series. He did a great deal of magazine and newspaper illustration work which is not as well known today.Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, John R. Neill did his first illustration work for the Philadelphia's Central High School newspaper in 1894-95. Neill dropped out of Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts after one semester because he said, "they have nothing to teach me."

30 review for The Emerald City of Oz (1910), by L. Frank Baum and John R. Neill(illustrated)Original Version: John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    The book consists of two completely different plotlines that kind of converge in the end with "kind of" being the key word. Plotline 1: Dorothy finally realized it would be a good idea to bring her aunt and uncle to the Land of Oz. She was made a princess of that land several books ago, but waited for a while before realizing it might be a good idea to bring her only living relatives to the magic place. Actually she waited until her uncle's health became so bad he could not work on his farm anym The book consists of two completely different plotlines that kind of converge in the end with "kind of" being the key word. Plotline 1: Dorothy finally realized it would be a good idea to bring her aunt and uncle to the Land of Oz. She was made a princess of that land several books ago, but waited for a while before realizing it might be a good idea to bring her only living relatives to the magic place. Actually she waited until her uncle's health became so bad he could not work on his farm anymore. For this reason I would call Dorothy to be a little slow in the mental department, even considering her age. This part was amusing at times and the new creatures encountered by Dorothy and her adoptive parents were highly imaginative and amusing. Dorothy's favorite pastime is to get lost and end up in the Land of Oz and here is no exception. This time she manage to get lost in Oz itself. By the way it might look cute, but the episode where she ended up hungry in a country of living gingerbread and insisted to eat some of its inhabitants stroke me as very disturbing. Plotline 2: The Nome King who was put to shame in front of his subjects by Dorothy and Co. in one of the previous books decided to take his revenge upon the inhabitants of the land of Oz. He enlisted some evil creatures to aid him and found the way to cross the impassable desert which separates Oz from the rest of the world. This one had so much potential, all wasted in the end. The beloved rules of Oz, princess Ozma did not even try to resist the invaders knowing in advance they would kill her mortal subjects and make slaves out of the immortal ones. Nice care for the people who adore her, by the way. This part was resolved by a heavy use of a typical Deux Ex Machina in the very end. L. Frank Baum wanted to finish the series with this book and it is very clearly shows here; we all know that he changed his mind later and wrote many more of the books of the series. The only reason I rated this one with 3 stars instead of more deserved 2 is the fact that I read the book twice. I did my reread to refresh my memory for the review and for the next book (I only read first six the first time around).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I liked The Emerald City of Oz a bit better than the last two. There was still an element of characters taking a trip just so Mr. Baum can show off all the other ideas he has for interesting creatures (Look! These ones are living jigsaw puzzles! And over here we have animated flatware! And these people can't stop talking!) but on the whole there was more plot than we've seen for a few books. First of all, there was some actual evil in the form of the Nome King and his General Guph. And there was I liked The Emerald City of Oz a bit better than the last two. There was still an element of characters taking a trip just so Mr. Baum can show off all the other ideas he has for interesting creatures (Look! These ones are living jigsaw puzzles! And over here we have animated flatware! And these people can't stop talking!) but on the whole there was more plot than we've seen for a few books. First of all, there was some actual evil in the form of the Nome King and his General Guph. And there was a genuine problem to overcome (i.e., the impending destruction of Oz by the Nomes and their allies). Not that Ozma seemed to care much. Drove me nuts that she "really hadn't given it much thought" that creatures who hated her and everything she and her people stood for were about to ravage her land and enslave her people! Really? I wonder if Mr. Baum was a pacifist or, alternately, if he thought pacifists were ridiculous. Ozma's "I-won't-fight-even-to-save-my-people-from-a-fate-worse-than-death" approach kind of left that up to interpretation. Some isolationism shows through, too. Interesting in light of the time in which it was written (early 20th century, prior to World War I). Anyway, I think Mr. Baum put a bit more in to this book because he planned for it to be the last. He seemed almost gleeful to include Dorothy's little letter in the last chapter. It's definitely an improvement over the last few. And my boys are still loving the series. :) For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tarissa

    Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have arrived in Oz -- what fun!! Not only that, but Dorothy and friends get to lead the newcomers to various places around the Land of Oz, and meet some of the most fascinating peoples. My favorites may have the been the living kitchen utensils of Utensia... what wit these people exhibited! Another intriguing point in this story is that Baum obviously intended for this to be the final book. Lo and behold, his readers didn't allow it. But this makes for a great "Reichenbach Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have arrived in Oz -- what fun!! Not only that, but Dorothy and friends get to lead the newcomers to various places around the Land of Oz, and meet some of the most fascinating peoples. My favorites may have the been the living kitchen utensils of Utensia... what wit these people exhibited! Another intriguing point in this story is that Baum obviously intended for this to be the final book. Lo and behold, his readers didn't allow it. But this makes for a great "Reichenbach Falls" ending, for the moment (Sherlockians know what this means).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marley

    Wow! Baum totally woke himself up out of the daze he'd been in for a couple of books and comes up with an awesome set of villains, some real sense of _stakes_ (not since "Ozma" had he really gone for that), this great country mouse/city mouse stuff with Aunt Em and Uncle Henry IN OZ, and even a cool quasi-ending to the series...though of course we know that wouldn't last.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Akiko

    This is my least favorite Oz book, but it still has lots of cute and fun things for the children... and adults??? ' ) The basics of this book are about the Gnobe King; he wants his magic belt back and he wants to take over the Land of Oz. He allies himself with some other despicable rulers, and meanwhile, Dorothy brings her (view spoiler)[Aunt and Uncle to Oz because of the foreclosure situation (hide spoiler)] , and meets up with old friends, and encounters new creatures... utensils... edible gat This is my least favorite Oz book, but it still has lots of cute and fun things for the children... and adults??? ' ) The basics of this book are about the Gnobe King; he wants his magic belt back and he wants to take over the Land of Oz. He allies himself with some other despicable rulers, and meanwhile, Dorothy brings her (view spoiler)[Aunt and Uncle to Oz because of the foreclosure situation (hide spoiler)] , and meets up with old friends, and encounters new creatures... utensils... edible gates... etc...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Line Bookaholic

    Dorothy’s Aunt and Uncle are in trouble at the farm. They do not have enough money to pay everything and they might be expulsed. Dorothy says to them they could go and live in Oz with her and Ozma agrees to that. So, once again, we found ourselves in the beautiful Land of Oz where Dorothy is going to live some great adventures and meet some new people. Like every time I read an Oz story, I’m amazed at how funny it is. This seems like it was the last story about Oz but I know there are many others Dorothy’s Aunt and Uncle are in trouble at the farm. They do not have enough money to pay everything and they might be expulsed. Dorothy says to them they could go and live in Oz with her and Ozma agrees to that. So, once again, we found ourselves in the beautiful Land of Oz where Dorothy is going to live some great adventures and meet some new people. Like every time I read an Oz story, I’m amazed at how funny it is. This seems like it was the last story about Oz but I know there are many others, so I am not sure about what happened here, I guess I will see when I read the others. I had a lot of fun reading this book and I think Oz is one of the greatest story ever, I’m totally fond of this world.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    This was one of the best Oz books!!! Dorothy's aunt and uncle move to Oz! They tour the land without knowing that the evil Nome king is tunneling right under them! When Dorothy gets back they fight off the Nome king and all is well......for now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara Santos

    Not as good as the last book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Worrell ツ

    3.5 star Working my way through the Oz stories with my reading buddy. The Emerald City of Oz started out very funny and entertaining with its great wordplay. Then the story took a little turn to the darker side.....lol Overall, a cute tale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shoshana

    Even though this book is mainly just Dorothy and friends wandering around Oz while the Nome King builds an army and a tunnel and no one does anything about it, I actually really like it a lot. I enjoy discovering the Flutterbudgets and Utensils and Bunburyans and Bunnyburyans and especially the Fuddles and Cuttenclips, not to mention the Whimsies. Oh, the Whimsies. They "had large, strong bodies, but heads so small that they were no bigger than door-knobs. Of course, such tiny heads could not co Even though this book is mainly just Dorothy and friends wandering around Oz while the Nome King builds an army and a tunnel and no one does anything about it, I actually really like it a lot. I enjoy discovering the Flutterbudgets and Utensils and Bunburyans and Bunnyburyans and especially the Fuddles and Cuttenclips, not to mention the Whimsies. Oh, the Whimsies. They "had large, strong bodies, but heads so small that they were no bigger than door-knobs. Of course, such tiny heads could not contain any great amount of brains, and the Whimsies were so ashamed of their personal appearance and lack of commonsense that they wore big heads made of pasteboard," which they decorate with pastel wool and large bright eyes. Baum is in top form here - as are my favorite characters: Billina, we discover, has had eleven children and named them all Dorothy (until two disobliged her by turning out roosters and she renamed them Daniel - funny, since back in Ozma of Oz she didn't see the point in changing her name from Bill when she discovered to be female) - and she has an additional 86 grandchildren and over three hundred great grandchildren, all of whom are ALSO named Dorothy and Daniel! I love Billina. And then there's Aunt Em. Part of what makes this one so good is Aunt Em's cranky, down-to-earth, back-to-reality commentary as she adjusts to life in Oz (Uncle Henry, who adapts better even though he originally had the most doubts, is less interesting, though amusingly placid). And I wondered where Dorothy got her combination of intrepidity and placidity! Upon first encountering the Cowardly Lion, Aunt Em decides to "eye that lion out o' countenance and save [their] lives," at which point she "turned upon the Lion a determined countenance and a wild dilated eye" until he becomes so uncomfortable that he asks if she's all right. Aunt Em is fierce! She is also the only skeptical person in the bunch. "I gave him some sawdust brains the last time I fitted his head with new ears," the Wizard explains about the intelligent Sawhorse. "'The sawdust was made from hard knots, and now the Sawhorse is able to think out any knotty problem he meets with.' 'I see,' said Uncle Henry. 'I don't," remarked Aunt Em; but no one paid any attention to this statement." Aunt Em might be my favorite character in this whole series. Then there's the weird part where Ozma notices the Nome King building a tunnel to the Emerald City and proceeds to do absolutely nothing and for a long time tell nobody about it. What? Finally our friends discover this pretty alarming situation and confront her, whereupon she laughs "with genuine amusement" and says, "Why, that has not troubled me a bit!" The prospect of the country she rules being conquered by a villainous army has not troubled her? What is the matter with her?!? "Perhaps it is more seirous than I imagined.... but I haven't given the matter much thought. After dinner we will all meet together and talk it over." Are you kidding me? I mean, I get that she's a pacifist (more on that in a moment), but you'd think she'd at least have thought about the situation! The pacifism is great, though. Ozma is completely adamant that no one has the right to hurt other living creatures in any way (which is a weird juxtaposition to Dorothy's cavalier attitude about eating the Bunburyans). Oz also happens to be explicitly communist (although Baum does append his description of their politics with the caveat that it might not work in the real world): "There were no poor people in the Land of Oz, because there was no such thing as money, and all property of every sort belonged to the Ruler.... Each person was given freely by his neighbors whatever he required for his use, which is as much as any one may reasonably desire.... Each man or woman, no matter what he or she produced for the good of the community, was supplied by the neighbors with food and clothing and a house and furniture and ornaments and games. If by chance the supply ever ran short, more was taken from the great storehouses of the Ruler, which were afterward filled up again when there was more of any article than the people needed." I feel nice knowing that I'm in the company of good old leftists. One last fault of this book, though, and it's a frustrating one, is their difficulty figuring out how to turn away the invaders. YOU HAVE THE FREAKING MAGIC BELT. USE IT TO SEND THEM ALL HOME. In fact, the Nome King plots about how once he gets the magic belt he'll use it to send his allies home if they turn against him, and in fact Ozma uses it at the end to send them all home after they have been incapacitated! Why not use it from the beginning? But no, we have to suspend our disbelief about a very convenient coincidence that allows for a more complex plan to be put in action. It heightens the suspense a little, I guess, but it is pretty irritating. And it's pretty much the only thing that keeps this book from a full five-star rating. I wish I could give it a four and a half, because it's better than the other Oz books I've given fours. Oh, well!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Baum originally intended this to be the final Oz book. That didn't work at all, of course, but this book has a very definitive conclusion that's obviously intended to end the entire series. As far as ending a saga goes, he did a good job (even though it didn't last). This book had more a plot than some, and it had an actual antagonist. The Nome King is a full-on bad guy, and Baum developed this story-telling element a step further by having two separate plots (the adventures of Dorothy, and the s Baum originally intended this to be the final Oz book. That didn't work at all, of course, but this book has a very definitive conclusion that's obviously intended to end the entire series. As far as ending a saga goes, he did a good job (even though it didn't last). This book had more a plot than some, and it had an actual antagonist. The Nome King is a full-on bad guy, and Baum developed this story-telling element a step further by having two separate plots (the adventures of Dorothy, and the schemes of the Nome King) running in alternating chapters until the climax of the book. Very well done, and more advanced than his previous "Dorothy just wandering around Oz" plots. I also enjoyed the development of the character of Ozma, who is shown to have (what I would consider) a major flaw in this book. I won't go into it for fear of spoilers, but I was really on the edge of my seat at the end of book, thinking "my gosh, did Ozma really just do that?" Well done, Baum - Ozma is still kind, sweet, and a good ruler, but is now no longer a one-dimensional character. I got a little bored, though, of the "Dorothy wandering around Oz" part of the plot. This is a staple of the Oz books, but for some reason I got frustrated with it more quickly in this book. Maybe it was the absurdity of all of the creatures she encountered and Baum's over-use of puns (like the Kingdom of Utensia, made up of animated flatware and kitchen equipment, and Miss Cuttenclip who lived in a village of paper dolls.) All in all, a good read, and if this had actually been the last Oz book, I would have been satisfied with it as an ending to a saga.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christine Blachford

    I thought this was a really good Oz story, a little bit darker than previous affairs, but well balanced and well written. I enjoyed the juxtaposition of Dorothy and her friends travelling to different lands alongside the Nome soldier doing the same, except his purpose was to recruit an army to invade Oz. I also thought it was about time Dorothy's aunt and uncle arrived in Oz, because through all their previous struggles it didn't make sense that they had so little while Oz had so much. It was fas I thought this was a really good Oz story, a little bit darker than previous affairs, but well balanced and well written. I enjoyed the juxtaposition of Dorothy and her friends travelling to different lands alongside the Nome soldier doing the same, except his purpose was to recruit an army to invade Oz. I also thought it was about time Dorothy's aunt and uncle arrived in Oz, because through all their previous struggles it didn't make sense that they had so little while Oz had so much. It was fascinating to ponder their adjustment to this fairy land, however. Kids are so much more open to that kind of thing than older folk. It's also interesting to read the end, where it clearly ties the story up in a neat little bow so that there should be no more correspondence from the world of Oz. And yet, being only partway through my compendium of Oz stories, I know that is not the case!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lori Anderson

    My son is six and we've been reading all the Oz books. They've done wonders for his reading comprehension and for his ability to just sit still and let me read three chapters at a time and have him actually understand and remember night to night what happened! This book is where L. Frank Baum finally seems to get tired of writing about Oz and Dorothy and tidies everything up and says goodbye. Yet there are more books. We haven't picked up the next one yet (but will tonight) so I'm not sure what t My son is six and we've been reading all the Oz books. They've done wonders for his reading comprehension and for his ability to just sit still and let me read three chapters at a time and have him actually understand and remember night to night what happened! This book is where L. Frank Baum finally seems to get tired of writing about Oz and Dorothy and tidies everything up and says goodbye. Yet there are more books. We haven't picked up the next one yet (but will tonight) so I'm not sure what to expect, but I'm glad there are more to read! Lori Anderson Lori Anderson:The Store Pretty Things:The Blog Facebook

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bobby Toskey

    This was better than the previous two. There was an antagonist, and it seemed to be building toward something. Ultimately, the antagonist did very little, and the story was mostly Dorothy and her friends walking around, meeting new people. It wasn't hard to get through, as the characters Dorothy comes across are interesting enough, but there is very little to sink your teeth into with this story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    4.5 Stars. Lots of fun new places and people in this one!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elf

    I want to live in Utensia.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard Knight

    Aunt Em and Uncle are in Oz, so that's different. Also, the deus ex machina at the end of this book is a bit too much to stomach. Even more than some of the other books in the series. And by the way this book ends, I'm wondering if L. Frank Baum intended on this to be his final book in the Oz series. But these are more musings than a review. Is it good? At times. The puns aren't too cringey this time. Do I regret getting so far in this series? Kind of, because now I have to read them all and I g Aunt Em and Uncle are in Oz, so that's different. Also, the deus ex machina at the end of this book is a bit too much to stomach. Even more than some of the other books in the series. And by the way this book ends, I'm wondering if L. Frank Baum intended on this to be his final book in the Oz series. But these are more musings than a review. Is it good? At times. The puns aren't too cringey this time. Do I regret getting so far in this series? Kind of, because now I have to read them all and I get a sense that they're all going to be like this. Oh, well. A decent book, but nothing to leave Kansas over.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Highness Atharva

    Well, Oz!!!! This is the paramount example of Classical Fairy tale for kids. Yeah, just for kids. The collection receives an average four stars. Well, the story revolves around Dorothy Gale a young girl from Kansas who has been swept away to the magical land of Oz and she has some wonderful adventures exploring the East, West, North, South of Oz and meeting the Munchkins and the other regional people of Oz. There are about a hundred characters in Oz. Main about 20. The oz is a great land and dif Well, Oz!!!! This is the paramount example of Classical Fairy tale for kids. Yeah, just for kids. The collection receives an average four stars. Well, the story revolves around Dorothy Gale a young girl from Kansas who has been swept away to the magical land of Oz and she has some wonderful adventures exploring the East, West, North, South of Oz and meeting the Munchkins and the other regional people of Oz. There are about a hundred characters in Oz. Main about 20. The oz is a great land and different books tell different stories from various regions. The characters in the book are Dorothy Gale, Ozma of Oz, Wizard of Oz, The Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, Tip, The Wooden Horse, The Shaggy Man, Rainbow Daughter, the regional people, Eureka, Jojo, Unc Nunkie, The Wicked witch, the Good Witch, The Nome King, Minions and many many more. In the first book Dorothy Gale explores the Oz country and battles the both bad witches and tries to reach her home but she finds that the wizard in oz is just a humbug and nothing much. The second book follows the story of Tip, who is a small boy who has been living with his dreadful aunt who is a witch and brings toys and scarecrow to oz, Tip escapes with them and finds that he is the princess of oz and follows a transformation. The third book contains Dorothy back as she visits Oz mistakenly due to an earthquake. Here the wizard runs underground with Dorothy. They fight wooden eagles, escape dreadful vegetable people meet Ozma again. Also Dorothy and Oz are regularly helped by Glinda the good. The fourth book summons Dorothy back, here she appears with her chicken in the land of Ev and finds that the Nome king has been harassing the people there and the royal family has been captured by the Nome King. She along with Ozma find and rescue the royal family. In the process Dorothy meets the army of Ozma and also Tik-Tok a unique machine. In the fifth book, there's no Dorothy here but Tip's back here and there's a girls scout rebel band led by Jinjur who fights Ozma to get some Emeralds as she does not want to do housework. All the previous books have a majority of Tin Woodman and The Wise scarecrow and the Cowardly lion and the eternally hungry Tiger and ducks and chickens and ironical cats. The sixth book has the my favorite character, a boy named Jo who accidentally has brought a Patchwork girl to life but in the process he has made his Uncle a marble statue and finds that he needs to find some magical times from the magician and visits the wonderful and magical land of Oz and meets other protagonists. Oz is the wonderful magical book thats written which contains tragedy, happiness(A lot), disasters, attacks and jokes and monsters and creatures and wizards and witches and rulers and nobles and lonely boys and girls and animals and epics and sights and gifts and great halls and of course Magic!!! A must read for all the kids and younger youths. Nice Reading !!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Don't know when I finished this book but it was in January at some time. This is, I believe, the sixth book of the Oz series. It's a better one because there are some actual formidable villains. The Nome King wants to capture Oz and enlists the help of wicked monsters far more powerful than he is. They all want to kill the mortals who live in Oz and enslave the immortal ones. (You know fairies and the like) The subplot is very sub. Ozma brings Dorothy's Aunt Em and Uncle Henry to move to Oz (real Don't know when I finished this book but it was in January at some time. This is, I believe, the sixth book of the Oz series. It's a better one because there are some actual formidable villains. The Nome King wants to capture Oz and enlists the help of wicked monsters far more powerful than he is. They all want to kill the mortals who live in Oz and enslave the immortal ones. (You know fairies and the like) The subplot is very sub. Ozma brings Dorothy's Aunt Em and Uncle Henry to move to Oz (really whether they like it or not) and then sends them on a tour of Oz. This tour bit tends to be a weakness in many Oz books. Baum creates new wacky creatures and communities for every Oz book, and sends the characters on a tour to meet these creatures. This must be what he really likes to do, because the tour generally adds nothing to the main plot. In this book there's a city of people who fall apart like puzzles. There's Bunbury, a city where everything and everyone is made of pastry or bread. And there's Bunnybury, which is inhabited by rabbits. But actually one of the best villages is in this book called Utensia, where all the inhabitants are kitchen utensils. They arrest Dorothy and put her on some sort of trial but every sentence spoken is kind of a pun. Quite brilliantly written, but it really adds nothing to the main plot. The frustrating part of this story is that Ozma, the leader of Oz, knows that the enemy is coming to take over Oz but does nothing about it. She doesn't want to harm any creature, even if it means the death of her own people and kingdom. If not for the Scarecrow's plan, Oz would have been destroyed. Ozma is heralded in these books as such a great and endearing leader and she's completely worthless. Thus the book only gets a 3 star rating.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shelli

    (Generalized spoilers, but the plot is so very thin it's hard to avoid mentioning the only action in the entire book.) Unfortunately, the Oz series really peters completely out with this entry. (Apparently Baum wanted to stop writing them as of this book, and IT SHOWS.) There is very little dramatic tension or, in fact, much of a plot. The bad guys are menacing enough and have some interesting potential, but our heroes don't know about them for much of the book and instead go galavanting aimless (Generalized spoilers, but the plot is so very thin it's hard to avoid mentioning the only action in the entire book.) Unfortunately, the Oz series really peters completely out with this entry. (Apparently Baum wanted to stop writing them as of this book, and IT SHOWS.) There is very little dramatic tension or, in fact, much of a plot. The bad guys are menacing enough and have some interesting potential, but our heroes don't know about them for much of the book and instead go galavanting aimlessly and pointlessly (and kind of weirdly) around. When the impending danger is finally revealed, the protagonists don't take it at all seriously, the Princess reveals herself to be a pathetic leader, and the strategic solution to defeating an invading army of thousands is casually thought up by one person out of the clear blue sky, who then implements it in under five minutes (while everyone else gets a good night's sleep!). Deux ex machina much?? Reportedly after "quitting" with this book, Baum was offered too much money to continue the Oz series that he simply could not resist. His heart was surely not in this one, and if they go downhill from here, I'm afraid they'll be abysmal. I think I'm done with the Oz series, I'm afraid.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Reade

    This is the first Oz book I have read, and I liked it. A lot. Actually, I would almost say I loved it. Sure, there were quite a few parts that dragged on a bit, and it was obvious Old L. Baum was making up most of it as he went along, but that didn't really bother me. After all, it is young adult fantasy written for children who are all over the age of one-hundred by now. The ending though, was too much. Too quick. There was absolutely no foreshadowing at all. Solutions to problems were proposed This is the first Oz book I have read, and I liked it. A lot. Actually, I would almost say I loved it. Sure, there were quite a few parts that dragged on a bit, and it was obvious Old L. Baum was making up most of it as he went along, but that didn't really bother me. After all, it is young adult fantasy written for children who are all over the age of one-hundred by now. The ending though, was too much. Too quick. There was absolutely no foreshadowing at all. Solutions to problems were proposed in the chapter just before the problem came about in the first place. Even as a kid, I found this sort of thing irritating. That cost the book one star. The imagery was great, and the trip through the land of Oz was as colorful and imaginative as I hoped it would be, so no star-loss there. There were also a lot of jokes. All terribly stupid. Puns, really. But I didn't care. I LOVE PUNS. "It takes pun to no one!" So, why didn't I rate this book higher? Where did the book lose another oh-so-important star? Let me answer with a statement: Dorothy is not a sweet little girl. She is a rude, irrational little butthole. Should you ever find yourself in Oz, please apologize to the Fairy Folk for her behaviour.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Uncle Henry and Aunt Em face financial difficulties. Conveniently, Dorothy happens to be a Princess of Oz where she is more than welcome to visit, so she wishes them all into Oz with the use of Ozma's Magic Belt. Meanwhile Roquat, the King of Nomes, is gathering an army and digging a tunnel to the Emerald City to seek vengeance and reclaim his Magic Belt. The Emerald City of Oz was a delightful read, with not a dull moment in sight. We are introduced to an abundance of people living in Oz, so man Uncle Henry and Aunt Em face financial difficulties. Conveniently, Dorothy happens to be a Princess of Oz where she is more than welcome to visit, so she wishes them all into Oz with the use of Ozma's Magic Belt. Meanwhile Roquat, the King of Nomes, is gathering an army and digging a tunnel to the Emerald City to seek vengeance and reclaim his Magic Belt. The Emerald City of Oz was a delightful read, with not a dull moment in sight. We are introduced to an abundance of people living in Oz, so many I've lost count. The most memorable and peculiar people were those residing in Utensia! This chapter was ridiculously punny and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The awaited battle in the Emerald City received an unexpectedly peaceful conclusion, which I loved. This book felt like the end to all stories of Oz but I know that's not the case!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A pretty disjointed book--it's sixth in the series, and Baum is clearly getting pretty tired of writing whimsical things, but hasn't yet resigned himself to it as in the later books. In fact, this one ends with Baum announcing there will be no more Oz books...a promise that probably lasted all of months, as Oz readers were quite demanding. This book has some fascinating subtexts about alliances between untrustworthy people, as a variety of horrible nations set up a complicated set of alliances to A pretty disjointed book--it's sixth in the series, and Baum is clearly getting pretty tired of writing whimsical things, but hasn't yet resigned himself to it as in the later books. In fact, this one ends with Baum announcing there will be no more Oz books...a promise that probably lasted all of months, as Oz readers were quite demanding. This book has some fascinating subtexts about alliances between untrustworthy people, as a variety of horrible nations set up a complicated set of alliances to try and invade Oz. Considering it's published in 1910--well, one can probably overread into children's books easily. :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    I liked all the pastry puns when they went to that town where everything was made of bread. I didn't realize so many jokes existed about it! And when they went to Utensia, & there were some cutlery puns. It was cute! I also liked that finally, Aunt Em & Uncle Henry got to join Dorothy in Oz. it was nice getting to know them as actual characters. It was almost anti-climactic how they defeated their enemies & saved Oz, but it was pretty funny to imagine how it happened. I also wondered I liked all the pastry puns when they went to that town where everything was made of bread. I didn't realize so many jokes existed about it! And when they went to Utensia, & there were some cutlery puns. It was cute! I also liked that finally, Aunt Em & Uncle Henry got to join Dorothy in Oz. it was nice getting to know them as actual characters. It was almost anti-climactic how they defeated their enemies & saved Oz, but it was pretty funny to imagine how it happened. I also wondered if they should give that Water Of Oblivion to the Flutterbudgets? Maybe it would help them not worry so much over nothing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scot

    This was a sweet one and meant to be the end of the Oz Saga, I am sure Baum was ready to move on to the next phase of his career and wrapped up the story of Dorothy with a neat bow. I rated it high mainly for a couple of chapters which were by far the funniest in the series thus far due to the amazing use of puns. I split my sides laughing which I had not done in any of the previous 5. I think I will take a break from the series now.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Technically the "final" book in the Oz series, and one that wraps up the history of the country and its zany inhabitants quite nicely. After this it's one wacky adventure after another in each book. All have pretty similar storylines with different characters taking on leading roles. They're fun, but that's about it. EXCEPT for the next book in the series (The Patchwork Girl of Oz), which is hands-down my favorite. That quilted doll is IL-AIR-E-OUS!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    The first Oz book since book 3 that had a resemblance of a plot. Then the plot was simplified. Then the plot was forgotten. Then the plot was remembered and disposed in about five pages. This was to be the last Oz book. It turns out he wrote nine more that I pray my son does not request to read. Read the first three books then STOP!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leo

    This book was alright. Some parts go off the deep end with eye-rolling puns. I like a good pun now and then, but give me a break. Some of the peoples the character meet seem to be there just so Baum can puntificate on the myriad of puns available in utensia and bunville.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lea Patrick

    I've been reading all of the oz books and while this one dragged in the middle somewhat it connected me more to Ozma than any of the previous books and I really love this book for the life lessons we could all learn from Ozma.

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