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The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913), by by L.Frank Baum and John R.Neill(illustrator): John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913), by by L.Frank Baum and John R.Neill(illustrator): John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator
Author: L. Frank Baum
Publisher: Published May 9th 2016 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (first published 1913)
ISBN: 9781533162816
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Patchwork Girl of Oz by L. Frank Baum, is a children's novel, the 7th set in the Land of Oz. Characters include the Woozy, Ojo "the Unlucky," Unc Nunkie, Dr. Pipt, Scraps (the patchwork girl), and others. The book was first published on July 1, 1913, with illustrations by John R. Neill. In 1914, Baum adapted the book to film through his "Oz Film Manufacturing Company." The Patchwork Girl of Oz by L. Frank Baum, is a children's novel, the 7th set in the Land of Oz. Characters include the Woozy, Ojo "the Unlucky," Unc Nunkie, Dr. Pipt, Scraps (the patchwork girl), and others. The book was first published on July 1, 1913, with illustrations by John R. Neill. In 1914, Baum adapted the book to film through his "Oz Film Manufacturing Company." In the previous Oz book, The Emerald City of Oz, magic was used to isolate Oz from all outside worlds. Baum did this to end the Oz series, but was forced to restart the series with this book due to financial hardships.[1] In the prologue, he explains how he managed to get another story about Oz, even though it is isolated from all other worlds. He explains that a child suggested he make contact with Oz with wireless telegraphy.[2] Glinda, using her book that records everything that happens, is able to know that someone is using a telegraph to contact Oz, so she erects a telegraph tower and has the Shaggy Man, who knows how to make a telegraph reply, tell the story contained in this book to Baum. The book was dedicated to Sumner Hamilton Britton, the young son of one of its publishers, Sumner Charles Britton of Reilly & Britton.Ojo the very unlucky, is a young Munchkin boy who, devoted to life with his uncle Unc Nunkie in the wilderness but on the verge of starvation, goes to see a neighboring "magician" and old friend of Unc, Dr. Pipt. While there they see a demonstration of the Pipt-made Powder of Life, which animates any object it touches after saying the magic words. Unc Nunkie and Dr. Pipt's wife are also the sufferers of the consequences of another of the Doctor's inventions, the Liquid of Petrifaction, which turns them into solid marble statues. The remainder of this book is Ojo's quest through Oz to collect the five components of an antidote to the Liquid: a six-leaved clover found only in the Emerald City, three hairs from the tip of a Woozy's tail, a gill (a quarter of a pint) of water from a dark well (one that remains untouched by natural light), a drop of oil from a live man's body, and the left wing of a yellow butterfly. With the help of the life-size patchwork doll named Scraps, Bungle the snobbish Glass Cat (another of Dr. Pipt's creations), the Woozy, Dorothy, the Shaggy Man, and the Scarecrow, Ojo gathers all of these supplies but the left wing - the Tin Woodman, who rules the yellow Winkie Country, which is the only place where yellow butterflies grow, will not allow any living thing to be killed, even to save another's life. The party returns to the Emerald City, where the Wizard of Oz (one of the few allowed to lawfully practice magic in Oz) uses his own magic to restore Unc Nunkie and Dr. Pipt's wife. The story is also a growth process for Ojo; he learns that luck is not a matter of who you are or what you have, but what you do; he is renamed "Ojo the Lucky," and so he appears in the following Oz books. John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) was a magazine and children's book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baum's, Ruth Plumly Thompson's, and three of his own. His pen-and-ink drawings have become identified almost exclusively with the Oz series. He did a great deal of magazine and newspaper illustration work which is not as well known today.

30 review for The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913), by by L.Frank Baum and John R.Neill(illustrator): John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) Was a Magazine and Children's Book Illustrator

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    People familiar with the first six books of the series might think it is all fun, rainbows, and unicorns in the Land of Oz. There are some not-quite-nice places, but they are isolated and their inhabitants never go outside of their designated area. The local population lives in what seems to be Communist Utopia. Well, guess again: the book starts with a young Manchkin boy Ojo who is about to starve as his only food was the last load of bread. Bummer, and I had such high hoped that the Communist People familiar with the first six books of the series might think it is all fun, rainbows, and unicorns in the Land of Oz. There are some not-quite-nice places, but they are isolated and their inhabitants never go outside of their designated area. The local population lives in what seems to be Communist Utopia. Well, guess again: the book starts with a young Manchkin boy Ojo who is about to starve as his only food was the last load of bread. Bummer, and I had such high hoped that the Communist Utopia would work at least somewhere. The little guy lives in a remote place with his uncle who is a descendant of the former disposed King of the Munchkin country. It seems to me they do not much like former kings and their kids for the generations to come in the magical land; add another blow for Utopia. Having nothing to lose the pair goes to see the world and the first place they end up is their closest neighbor, the Crooked Magician who was about to start an interesting magic experiment. Unsurprisingly things go terribly wrong and now it is up to Ojo to restore his uncle and the magician's wife back to life while the magician was developing an alternative method - a very slow one. In the beginning I seriously considered giving this book 4 stars. L. Frank Baum decided to finish the series with the last book; there was some finality as well as closure. Bowing to the pressure (readers, publishers, monetary, or all of them) he wrote this book which feels like a fresh start in the beginning. Some of the humor of the first book finally made a comeback: It is classical music, and is considered the best and most puzzling ever manufactured. You're supposed to like it, whether you do or not, and if you don't, the proper thing is to look as if you did. Understand? I do not think anybody would disagree with this observation, even more than 100 years after it was made. As an additional bonus: the Scarecrow got himself a girlfriend. On a slightly negative note they added poetry talent to the Patchwork Girl when they made her so the readers have to suffer through a lot of bad poetry, mercifully short every time. The second half of the book is where it all started going downhill - the closer to the end, the faster. Ozma, for all of her supposed sweetness and sense of justice feels quite cruel to me. When you think about it from an adult point of view she acts like a puppet for Glinda the Good; and the latter is quite despotic in her methods. Add to this Tim Woodman's overdoing his whole compassion thing - well into retarded territory - and the rush ending and you would understand why the idea of completely abandoning the series came to my mind. The final rating would not be a complete surprise: 3 stars. I will still continue with the series.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    The Patchwork Girl of Oz is not about the Patchwork Girl of Oz, but rather is the story of a little munchkin boy and his motley assortment of followers journeying across the land of Oz in search of items that will create a magic capable of saving the boy's beloved uncle. However, one of those motley followers is the Patchwork Girl and she absolutely steals the show! Her goofy optimism is infectious. Perhaps some might find her to be a Jenna Elfman-sized annoyance, but for my part I thoroughly en The Patchwork Girl of Oz is not about the Patchwork Girl of Oz, but rather is the story of a little munchkin boy and his motley assortment of followers journeying across the land of Oz in search of items that will create a magic capable of saving the boy's beloved uncle. However, one of those motley followers is the Patchwork Girl and she absolutely steals the show! Her goofy optimism is infectious. Perhaps some might find her to be a Jenna Elfman-sized annoyance, but for my part I thoroughly enjoyed the full dose of daffy she poured into this book, which has been my favorite thus far of Baum's original Oz series. Keep in mind it is a children's book. The conundrums put to our heros are not mindbogglingly difficult for them to overcome and it's hardly a spoiler to say things end happily. The Patchwork Girl might also appeal more to fans of the Wizard of Oz movie as it brings back some recognizable characters. Dorothy, the Scarecrow and Tin Man all make brief cameos...oh yes, and Toto too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Let me tell you, dear readers...not all Oz books are created equal. I am deep into my mission to read all of the the Oz books (at least, all the volumes credited to Mr. Baum himself) and if anyone should try to follow suit, he or she had better do as the great Bette Davis once suggested and buckle their seat belts, 'cause guess what? It's going to be a bumpy read. In the Patchwork Girl of Oz the miraculous Powder of Life makes another appearance as a character called the Crooked Magician (nearly Let me tell you, dear readers...not all Oz books are created equal. I am deep into my mission to read all of the the Oz books (at least, all the volumes credited to Mr. Baum himself) and if anyone should try to follow suit, he or she had better do as the great Bette Davis once suggested and buckle their seat belts, 'cause guess what? It's going to be a bumpy read. In the Patchwork Girl of Oz the miraculous Powder of Life makes another appearance as a character called the Crooked Magician (nearly as literally named an Oz character gets) mixes up a potion in his kitchen to whip up a servant girl for his wife out of a rag doll made from a patchwork quilt. By now, Oz readers know that any magic with a whiff of ill motives or humbuggery will ultimately go awry, and predictably this experiment is no exception. Although the girl is brought to life, she's a little more than the recipe bargained for, and in the process of her creation, a few dramatic magic misfires result that need a quest to sort out. Several new characters are introduced, though most of these are quite annoying. The Patchwork Girl herself is goodhearted but sadly, is about as much of a Frankenstein monster in personality as she is physically (I dare you to find an edition of this that *doesn't* have an absolutely terrifying cover. Seriously, go on...I'll wait). She has an unfortunate habit of sporadically launching into bad rhyme and arbitrary looniness, and the fact that her travel companions are just as horrified by the quirk doesn't help it go down any better. The glass cat falls along the lines of one of those broken record Oz characters that can't talk without skipping back to its signature refrain (in this case, its fascination for its own appearance), and don't even get me started on the amorphous (and fairly useless) Woozy. The only saving grace for this particular scrap in the quilt we know as the Oz saga is the appearance of the Shaggy Man, who truly must be charmed by the love magnet, because he seems impervious even to the taint of these tedious travel companions and Ojo, the boy who launches the magic quest, because he feels like a authentic kid at least, even if he may be a bit of a Tip retread. For readers who like the framework of the road trip/quest, there are books in the Oz series that do it better with less annoying characters. Pass on this one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    `Ashlula` Ayse

    Although this one began with a few gems and a sparkling new character addition; it quickly turned into a bore. The phrase of Scraps; 'I am original, therefore thoroughly incomparable' was so promising but not much came out of it to .

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tabby

    This was my favorite Oz book so far! Review to come (maybe)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I am loving this series!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sara Santos

    3,5 Not as good as the other books.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Roman Kurys

    Another installment in the magical land of Oz has come to an end and I am not ashamed to admit that I enjoyed this adventure pretty much the same as I have all the previous ones. Yes, it is very simple. Yes, it follows the same formula that made the original successful. Yes, I don’t care. It was fun to read nonetheless. Characters: 4 This is the main attraction of Oz adventures to me. I am expecting a travelogue, since that is just what it is, but what never ceases to amaze me is Baum’s ability to Another installment in the magical land of Oz has come to an end and I am not ashamed to admit that I enjoyed this adventure pretty much the same as I have all the previous ones. Yes, it is very simple. Yes, it follows the same formula that made the original successful. Yes, I don’t care. It was fun to read nonetheless. Characters: 4 This is the main attraction of Oz adventures to me. I am expecting a travelogue, since that is just what it is, but what never ceases to amaze me is Baum’s ability to create whacky characters who are too ridiculous to be thought of as characters in just about any other piece of fiction on earth. I mean think about it: A talking gramophone not good enough? Ok. I give you a broken up talking gramophone. Not good enough still? Ok. I give you a broken up talking gramophone that everyone in the story hates! Oh also there is a sort of a girl made from sawn together pieces of quilt (all multicolored like a gleeman’s cloak in R.Jordan’s “Wheel of Time” series. Not sure why this is the association that i get.) And oh, lets not forget a dog of sorts, made from stacked up rectangles who speaks, has exactly 3 hairs which are impossible to pull out on its rectangle tail, thinks it has the most fearsome howl and shoots fire from its eyes. I mean...this is either someone high on some illegal substance, or someone with imagination that acts the same way as it the person was high on some illegal substance. I don’t even know who the main characters are and I really don’t care. Oh almost forgot!!! Horners and Hammerheads??? Fantastic. Simply fantastic. Plot: 3 Basic but steady. Much the same like in all the other Oz stories. There is not much to really say. If you have read all the previous Oz books, (and I imagine pretty much just about everyone would not be starting a series on #7) you know exactly what to expect from a plot. Although I did think that the ending was a bit rushed. It felt like Baum just kept going on and and and on and thought, oh wait, I kind of need to wrap this up. And BAM. Setting: 4 I really enjoyed the setting in this books also. In truth, this rating is a bit inflated. I did not exactly enjoy this specific book setting enough to warrant 4 stars. I gave 4 stars to the overall Land of Oz. The build up and familiarity at this point are innate. I know what country is where, I know who lives where, I know some of the characters mentioned here and there, which makes me feel immersed in the land faster and faster. I imagine this is why Baum was getting requests to write more books after he wanted to wrap up the entire series. The story at this point would need to be really bad for me to not like it, so there goes the unfair 4 stars. Overall, if you are this deep in the series, keep reading. Might as well wrap it up. I know I will surely be coming back to Baum’s OZ in the near future. Plus probably delve into some of the retelling as well. Roman “Ragnar”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pink

    I've said it before and I'll say it again. Things have got very repetitive with this series. Baum had a formula that worked and everyone wanted more, so he gave it to them. These are perfectly enjoyable children's stories, but as an adult they're not my preferred reading experience. Here's looking forward with hope to the next seven...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This wasn't my favorite Oz book, but it was still enjoyable. I especially liked the vain glass cat with pink brains and the Hoppers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    This was the fifth of L. Frank Baum's fourteen Oz books that I have read with my son. We have not read all of the books in chronological order, though I don't think it makes much difference; though I may be wrong about this and it may account for some inconsistencies that we have noticed in the works. We were both surprised on this reading by the many contradictions and inconsistencies in Baum's writing. The last Oz book we read was Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, the fourth work in the Oz series. This was the fifth of L. Frank Baum's fourteen Oz books that I have read with my son. We have not read all of the books in chronological order, though I don't think it makes much difference; though I may be wrong about this and it may account for some inconsistencies that we have noticed in the works. We were both surprised on this reading by the many contradictions and inconsistencies in Baum's writing. The last Oz book we read was Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, the fourth work in the Oz series. In that work Baum makes it clear that those in Oz never age -- children remain children forever and adults remain adults. While we have not read the fifth and sixth books in the series yet (The Road to Oz and The Emerald City of Oz), in this, the seventh installment in the series (The Patchwork Girl of Oz), Baum writes of the Munchkin boy Ojo that he will, with the passing of years, grow to the size and stature of his uncle. Meanwhile, characters like Ozma (the girl ruler of Oz) never grow or age. Another example of inconsistencies: In both Ozma of Oz (the third Oz book) and Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz we find that animals, when they come from the real world to the fairy land of Oz, suddenly become anthropomorphized, attaining the ability to think/reason and speak (in the first, we can point to the example of Dorothy's chicken, Bilina, and in the latter to Dorothy's kitten, Eureka -- who also remains a kitten in the 7th book, i.e., she does not age or grow -- and her cousin Zeb's horse, Jim). Yet, while other animals, in the fairy land of Oz develop the ability to speak and reason Toto is never able to do so (not in the first book in the Oz series and not in this book, where Baum writes, "He can't talk, not being a fairy dog"). These and other minor inconsistencies in the books made for a very scrutinizing read. In this story, the reader accompanies Ojo the Unlucky Munchkin boy, the Glass Cat and the Patchwork Girl (the latter both creations of the Crooked Magician) on a journey to find five magic items in the wonderful Land of Oz to restore to life Ojo's Uncle Nunkie and the Crooked Magician's wife, Margolotte, who turn to marble when the Magician's Elixir of Petrification accidentally falls upon them. On his journey, Ojo meets many strange creatures and interesting characters, some new (the Woozy, the Hoppers and Horners, etc.) and some familiar (like the Scarecrow, Jack Pumpkinhead and Dorothy). As much as I tried to get lost in the fairyland of Oz, I couldn't get past many of the contradictions and I also found it difficult to ignore the oppressive nature of Baum's Oz -- nowhere clearer than in this book (though it is only the fifth of fourteen that I have read). In many ways Baum's Oz is not very different from the dystopian society painted by Huxley in A Brave New World or that of Orwell's 1984. Yet, there is no Winston Smith in this work to challenge the social order. Everything in Oz is accepted for what it is and society runs, thus, smoothly. As I delve deeper into Baum's magical world, I find myself ever more critical. The more one reads of the Oz books, it is easier to align with the dystopian revisionist version of the first Oz story as told by Gregory Maguire in his book "Wicked." Oz seems, the more one travels in it, a very oppressive land. Some examples: (1) Oz and the Natural Social Division of Labor Emile Durkheim, in a neo-Platonist fashion, makes the case in his 1893 book, The Division of Labour in Society that so long as a division of labor comes about naturally (based on peoples' natural talents), society will operate with few problems. There are some people who are naturally born to be servants and ditch diggers and others who are naturally born to be doctors and lawyers. Durkheim's analysis places white men in a favored position, using questionable science to support his views throughout. In this Oz work, the Crooked Magician creates a magic potion to bring to life the patchwork girl that his wife sewed together. The patchwork girl ("Scraps") is intended to be the servant of the magician's wife, Margolotte. In creating her servant, Margolotte first explains that she made the patchwork girl of many different colors of fabric so as to ensure that she will "never dare be rebellious or impudent, as servants are sometimes liable to be when they are made the same way their mistresses are." Munchkins favor the color blue; the Patchwork girl, however, is made of "so many unpopular colors" that Margolotte assumes she will never consider herself equal to her mistress, and thus never step out of her proper place. Later, in giving her brains, Margolotte explains that she "must be careful not to give her too much brains, and those she has must be fitted to the station she is to occupy in life. In other words, [as a servant] her brains mustn't be very good" and she mustn't "feel above her station." While Ojo interferes and adjusts the quantity and quality of brains that Margolotte has given the patchwork girl when her back is turned, certain implications are still made. And Scraps is reminded throughout that, despite her capacities for thinking and reasoning, that she is "personal property." While Scraps, for her thoughtfulness and helpfulness throughout is eventually granted freedom by Ozma and the Wizard, I am still not convinced that Oz is the wonderful place it is painted to be -- when servants are content so long as they are properly enabled with a feeble mind and not too much sense and so long as they feel subservient. In the next example (below) we see that the division of labor in Oz is not always "natural," however - it may also be forced or coerced to ensure that the needs of the society are met. (2) Ozma the Dictator In the book a case is made that the Emerald City is not only the best, but the most desirable place to live in all of the Land of Oz. Yet, not all people can live in the Emerald City even if they want to (which ties back to the division of labor and the needs of the society). As the Shaggy Man explains: "In this country, people live wherever our Ruler tells them to. It wouldn't do to have everyone live in the Emerald City, you know, for some must plow the land and raise grains and fruit and vegetables, while others chop wood in the forests, or fish in the rivers, or herd the sheep and the cattle." Others live in the city who want to "get back to the land," but don't because they are ordered otherwise by the kind and just girl ruler of Oz, who is attended to by humble servants and whose place in the social order is unchallenged. It seems to me that Thomas Paine would have ordered a revolt against the girl monarch had he entered the fairyland's borders. (3) Oz, the Surveillance State Not unlike the dystopian world found in Orwell's 1984, where Big Brother sees all, "nothing can be hidden" in Oz. Ozma, the girl ruler is in possession of a Magic Picture that allows her to watch the activities of any of her subjects. And if something happens to slip under her radar, it is not likely to slip under the "watchful eyes of the humble Wizard of Oz" or of Glinda the good witch. It's fortunate that everyone in Oz is so content with their positions; Ojo is only one of two to have ever been accused of breaking any of the laws of Ozma's kingdom. (4) Every law is a good law When Ojo is arrested for picking a six-leafed clover, an item that he must retrieve for the Crooked Magicians' magic potion, he questions the justness of such a law. Ozma explains that all laws exist for a reason and that in this case most people pick six-leafed clovers to practice magic, which is forbidden for all except for the Wizard and Glinda the good witch (as she knows they will practice only good magic and not black magic). Justifying the existence of all laws, Ozma explains: "I suppose a good many laws seem foolish to those people who do not understand them, but no law is ever made without some purpose. . . . in any even it is wrong to disobey a Law." I suppose Baum wasn't much for civil disobedience. In the ethics course that I teach one of the first lessons we go over is that just because something is protected by a law does not mean that it is necessarily morally/ethically justified; we discuss such examples as slavery, race-based drug laws, Jim Crow, the denial of voting rights to women, the laws of Nazi Germany, etc. And my son and I had this discussion after reading this chapter of the book. Baum here provides a noncritical "just-the-way-it-is" view for young readers, in my perspective. Another objection I had with this work was with Baum's treatment of music. The Magician's Elixir of Life accidentally spills upon his phonograph table, bringing that machine to life. The magician and all of the other characters that the phonograph encounters find it a very annoying device. As a lover of all kinds of music, I found Baum's discussions of music comical but also troubling. In one scene, the phonograph plays for the travelers a classical record and explains, "[C]lassical music is considered the best and most puzzling ever manufactured. You're supposed to like it, whether you do or not, and if you don't, the proper thing is to look as if you did." And it is a good thing Baum did not live long enough to see the birth of rock n' roll, because with his apparent distaste for even the popular music of his day, rock n' roll might have given him a heart attack. Discussing popular music, Baum writes at one point that it "Makes civilized folks wild folks. . . . [I]t's dangerous" and later explains that a popular song is "One that the feeble-minded can remember the words of and those ignorant of music can whistle or sing. . . . and the time is coming when it will take the place of all other songs." All of the characters in the book share a similar distaste for music, both classical and popular - the phonograph (whose part is a small one) is easily the most detested character in the book. So, with all of these faults why did I give the book three stars (well, 2.5 really)? Despite so many perceived flaws, I can't help but still be enchanted by the strange creations of Baum's imagination. And despite my views of Oz as a somewhat tyrannical land, it is also a land of possibilities. Scraps, intended to be a dull-minded servant, is granted freedom by the girl ruler of Oz (even if others are ordered by her where to live and what type of work to perform). Ojo the Unlucky is encouraged by the Tin Woodman to look on the bright side of life and to consider himself Ojo the Lucky -- that considering oneself lucky or unlucky is oftentimes a matter of perspective (there is a whole discourse on how the number 13 is often considered an unlucky number though many people fail to realize the many good things that may happen to them on the 13th day of the month), a point elaborated on earlier by the Shaggy Man, when he explains that so many "evils in life" are really optical illusions: "they seem to exist, and yet it's all seeming and not true." I also find myself aligning with Baum's sociological and humanistic views on criminal justice, believing that much crime is the result of unhappiness and want and that prisoners should be treated humanely (picking up on a subject also discussed in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz). This is definitely not my favorite of the Oz books, but despite its many weaknesses it does possess some redeeming qualities.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tarissa

    I have to give major applause to the author in how he brought the Land of Oz back to life. This was like Reichenbach Falls (Sherlock Holmes reference) for Dorothy Gale. And how does the Land of Oz come back, even though we were cut off from Oz in the last book, with brand new stories for readers?... Through the clever device of... the telegraph. (Mind blown.) So I was basically ready to give the book 5 stars just because of how the author wheedled his way out of that tight fix he put himself in. O I have to give major applause to the author in how he brought the Land of Oz back to life. This was like Reichenbach Falls (Sherlock Holmes reference) for Dorothy Gale. And how does the Land of Oz come back, even though we were cut off from Oz in the last book, with brand new stories for readers?... Through the clever device of... the telegraph. (Mind blown.) So I was basically ready to give the book 5 stars just because of how the author wheedled his way out of that tight fix he put himself in. Oh, and secondly because there may just be love in the air for the beloved Scarecrow. (This strangely excites me to no end.) Anyways, on the main gist of the book. Here we are along for the ride of another interesting trek through Oz. This time it is quest that a Munchkin boy named Ojo is on, to collect some very vital ingredients for the Crooked Magician. The reader gets to meet a variety of intriguing individuals, make some new friends in Oz, and overall have a wonderful time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Making Oz invisible did nothing for the stories leaking out. Apparently Ozma didn't have any more control over the media than other rulers. But I liked this one. There is a plot besides Dorothy getting lost and wandering around until she manages to get to Oz, plus some new characters of reasonable weirdness. Ojo is a young Munchkin lad, raised in isolation by a very taciturn uncle (Unc Nunkie - I wouldn't talk much either). The leave their isolated forest - food isn't plentiful and there is no on Making Oz invisible did nothing for the stories leaking out. Apparently Ozma didn't have any more control over the media than other rulers. But I liked this one. There is a plot besides Dorothy getting lost and wandering around until she manages to get to Oz, plus some new characters of reasonable weirdness. Ojo is a young Munchkin lad, raised in isolation by a very taciturn uncle (Unc Nunkie - I wouldn't talk much either). The leave their isolated forest - food isn't plentiful and there is no one around to share - and run into trouble on their first day out. While visiting a magician who practices his craft illegally, Ojo's uncle is turned to marble (along with the magician's wife, which seemed less tragic). At the same time, the Patchwork Girl is brought to life - her body was made by the magician's wife, but Ojo tampered with the makings of her brain and the result was a rather Joan Cusack-like Patchwork Girl. Ojo, the Patchwork Girl and the Glass Cat set off to gather the items needed to save the marble statues. They end up in the Emerald City, where the prison system is very modern in its approach to punishment, and Dorothy decides to join them in their travels to finish up the list. While the general sense of the land is tolerance and sharing, Dorothy and the Scarecrow show themselves to be a bit less than open-minded. Kinda bothered me, actually. Overall, the sense is that this tale may not have leaked out so much as been fed to the media on the outside.

  14. 5 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    This is my second time through reading this one, its got a different feel than most of the other Oz books, most likely due to the main characters being brand new ones, and the old favorites like Dorothy and the Shaggy Man only coming in half way through the book. I always feel bad for the living phonograph, he seemed to only get abuse. Perhaps that's it, in this book it shows that not everything is nice in Oz. The wilderness has bad as well as good parts, there are hungry giants, and squabbling This is my second time through reading this one, its got a different feel than most of the other Oz books, most likely due to the main characters being brand new ones, and the old favorites like Dorothy and the Shaggy Man only coming in half way through the book. I always feel bad for the living phonograph, he seemed to only get abuse. Perhaps that's it, in this book it shows that not everything is nice in Oz. The wilderness has bad as well as good parts, there are hungry giants, and squabbling cities, and not everyone is delighted EVERY DAY. (its also really cute to see the Scarecrow fall in love.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Marie

    I really liked this story of Oz. Like many people in Oz, I found the Patchwork Girl charming, Ojo's story broke my heart every time it was told, and I was happy with how it was resolved. However, I feel like the more I read into the series, the less I like Ozma, I just can't put my finger on why yet.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Kilgore

    Easily one of the best in the series. Baum spins a marvelous quest story with some of his best characters. Truly a delight from beginning to end!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Professor

    This one was a lot of fun as Patches, Ojo and the Glass Cat are all fine additions to the ranks of Oz characters. MicroMort enjoyed it quite a bit.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I actually really liked this book, and wanted to give it at least 4 stars, but several elements made me feel that a 3 star rating was more accurate. First off, I really enjoyed the tale as a whole. It was still a "wandering around Oz encountering oddities" story, as most of the Oz books have been, but this time the characters were on a quest to gather objects for a spell to save Ojo's uncle (instead of the wandering being mere happenstance or because they were lost). There was a good deal more ch I actually really liked this book, and wanted to give it at least 4 stars, but several elements made me feel that a 3 star rating was more accurate. First off, I really enjoyed the tale as a whole. It was still a "wandering around Oz encountering oddities" story, as most of the Oz books have been, but this time the characters were on a quest to gather objects for a spell to save Ojo's uncle (instead of the wandering being mere happenstance or because they were lost). There was a good deal more character conflict and dynamics than in previous books. Old favorites like Dorothy, the Scarecrow, The Shaggy Man, and of course Ozma made appearances in the second half of the book, and were worked into the story quite well without taking it over. What made this book only rate a 3 star from me was mostly the ending. I don't want to give spoilers, but I found the ending to be very deux ex machina, in addition to being very abrupt. And on that note (still without giving spoilers), Baum seems to still be making up the magic of Oz as he goes along. There are no rules within the world, and so the magic (and other elements of the world) are inconsistent. Ozma's and Glinda's powers change from book to book, depending on the needs of the story. Other magical elements, like Ozma's magic mirror and Magic Belt, and Glinda's book, show up only when Baum seems to run out of other ideas or has written himself into a corner. (The Magic Belt with its teleporting powers could really have saved the characters in almost every book several hundred pages' worth of wandering and misadventures - which of course would mean no story, but aside from Ozma perhaps having a blonde moment, there's no logical explanation as to why Ozma doesn't use the Belt more often). My other main reason for rating this book lower than some is the title. The Patchwork girl is a main character, but she's not the protagonist, and there's almost no character development for her during the course of the story. She's funny and quirky and adds to the inter-character tension of the group during their adventures, but even after she becomes smitten with the Scarecrow, she doesn't change or deepen as a character. The protagonist is Ojo, a Munchkin boy who is on a quest to save his uncle who got turned into a marble statue. Ojo is a well-developed character with strengths and flaws, unlike the Patchwork Girl. I can understand that "The Patchwork Girl of Oz" makes for a catchy title and offers the opportunity for more entertaining cover art than "The Munchkin Boy of Oz," but for the entire story I was waiting for the Patchwork Girl to grow as a character (the way the Scarecrow did in the first book), except it never happened. All in all, though, another fun Oz book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    Fun for the kids, but not quite as much for the adults. The constant questing theme has been overplayed by Baum. Basically, The Patchwork Girl of Oz foists one wacky new character after another on readers, tries to coax a chortle or two out of us, provides yet more evidence that Oz is a socialist utopia, and puts a bow on the whole bit by offering a heart-warming ending. Yawn. In this installment of the Oz saga, Baum focuses his progressive sensibilities on prison systems. Munchkin boy Ojo breaks Fun for the kids, but not quite as much for the adults. The constant questing theme has been overplayed by Baum. Basically, The Patchwork Girl of Oz foists one wacky new character after another on readers, tries to coax a chortle or two out of us, provides yet more evidence that Oz is a socialist utopia, and puts a bow on the whole bit by offering a heart-warming ending. Yawn. In this installment of the Oz saga, Baum focuses his progressive sensibilities on prison systems. Munchkin boy Ojo breaks a law of Oz and goes to prison. Jailer Tollydiggle explains her kindness and the overall fine state of the prison as follows:"We consider a prisoner unfortunate. He is unfortunate in two ways--because he has done something wrong and because he is deprived of his liberty. Therefore we should treat him kindly, because of his misfortune, for otherwise he would become hard and bitter and would not be sorry he had done wrong. Ozma thinks that one who has committed a fault did so because he was not strong and brave; therefore she puts him in prison to make him strong and brave. When that is accomplished he is no longer a prisoner, but a good and loyal citizen and everyone is glad that he is now strong enough to resist doing wrong. You see, it is kindness that makes one strong and brave; and so we are kind to our prisoners."I'm a utopian at heart, so the sentiment resonates with me. The kids weren't impressed, however, and the lesson on prison reform certainly brought an awkward serious pause to a not-so-serious story. On the positive side, the ending will make you smile. And the sweet relationship between Ojo and Unc Nunkie might moisten an eye or two. But overall, meh.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    I was disappointed in this book. As a self-taught quilter I was trawling Gutenberg in search of books about patchwork or with it mentioned in the title; so far I am underwhelmed with the results. The Patchwork Girl is not really the main character of the book at all, and everyone finds her personality bumptious and uncomfortable, in part because she has no heart and her head is stuffed with cotton wool. She spouts doggerell and dances, and that's about all she does. As for Ojo and Unc Nunkie--ge I was disappointed in this book. As a self-taught quilter I was trawling Gutenberg in search of books about patchwork or with it mentioned in the title; so far I am underwhelmed with the results. The Patchwork Girl is not really the main character of the book at all, and everyone finds her personality bumptious and uncomfortable, in part because she has no heart and her head is stuffed with cotton wool. She spouts doggerell and dances, and that's about all she does. As for Ojo and Unc Nunkie--geh, those names! It's yet another quest story, which is what Baum seems to have written for the early Oz series, but somehow it just didn't appeal to me. The situations and characters were pretty insipid, from the lazy Munchkin who'd rather take a pill than eat, to the conceited glass cat whose pink brains aren't really up to much. Written in 1913, it's the first after the author's decision to write no more Oz stories, ever--and it shows. His heart really wasn't in it. I was struck by the Tottenhots' houses being lined with this "beautiful metal like translucent frosted silver" that turns out to be--Radium! We are told that "No one can be sick who lives near radium." But then of course Mme Curie carried bits of it in her pockets...and died later of radiation sickness. The ending seemed truncated; the only real purpose to the novel seems to be a lesson against superstitions such as Friday 13 and "being unlucky." The quest in itself comes to nothing, so Baum resolves the problem in a very unsatisfying deus ex machina way. There was none of the sense of fun and "magic" in the old 19th century sense of the word. Two stars is a generous rating.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christine Blachford

    It's always fun to see an author resurrect a series that they had previously finished off so neatly. After tying up all the loose ends in the last book, Baum has to concede the children love Oz too much not to hear from there again, and hey presto, another story. I thought this one got off to a bit of a slow start, with monosyballic Unc and a mediocre journey to the wizard. However, when things go wrong and the Patchwork Girl is created, the traditional adventures start to begin - many strange ch It's always fun to see an author resurrect a series that they had previously finished off so neatly. After tying up all the loose ends in the last book, Baum has to concede the children love Oz too much not to hear from there again, and hey presto, another story. I thought this one got off to a bit of a slow start, with monosyballic Unc and a mediocre journey to the wizard. However, when things go wrong and the Patchwork Girl is created, the traditional adventures start to begin - many strange characters, many strange lands, lots of imagination. It's quite nice, too, that Dorothy only comes in at the end of the story, going on only one portion of the journey. And there's a nice moral about not believing yourself to be unlucky and in thinking positively.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dorie

    The Patchwork Girl of Oz🍒🍒🍒🍒 Land of Oz # 7 By Baum 1913 This book introduces us to Ojo, The Unlucky, a munchkin boy, who sets out on a quest to save his Uncle, Unc Nunkie from starvation, and begins by visiting old friend Dr. Pipt. Dr. Pipt demonstrated his 'Powder of Life' which animates any object it touches with magic words. He invented this powder for his wife, Margolette, to bring a patchwork doll to life to be her slave. However, another of Dr. Pipts inventions, the Liquid of Petrifacation, h The Patchwork Girl of Oz🍒🍒🍒🍒 Land of Oz # 7 By Baum 1913 This book introduces us to Ojo, The Unlucky, a munchkin boy, who sets out on a quest to save his Uncle, Unc Nunkie from starvation, and begins by visiting old friend Dr. Pipt. Dr. Pipt demonstrated his 'Powder of Life' which animates any object it touches with magic words. He invented this powder for his wife, Margolette, to bring a patchwork doll to life to be her slave. However, another of Dr. Pipts inventions, the Liquid of Petrifacation, has spilled on his wife and him turning them to marble. The only way to save his uncle is to find an antidote for the Liquid of Petrification. He needs to find 5 specific ingredients for the antidote. Ojos searches through Oz, for these 5 ingredients: 1. 3 hairs from the tip of a Woozy tail. 2. A gill ( quarter pint) of water from a dark well. 3. A drop of oil from a live human body. 4. A 6 leaf clover. 5. The left wing of a yellow butterfly Ojo has collected all but the left wing because Yellow butterfly's only live in the Country of Winkie, where the Tin Man is emperor and he will not allow any living thing to die, even to save another. So they return to Emerald City and enlist the help of the Wizard of Oz. The wizard grants his wish and then renamed him Ojo The Lucky. An interesting note: Baum wrote an additional chapter, titled 'The Garden of Meats'. It deals with a race of vegetable people, called Mangaboos. These vegetable people grew "meat people" for food, the plants main feature were heads of human children. Baum was asked to not include the chapter by his editors, and it has been deleted and never found, except in reference. I love this series....the wacky characters and plots. This is probably one of the best in the series so far......

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    In this story it tells of a boy and his uncle that live in a secluded area in the land of Oz. They are very poor and there land is not supporting them enough, so they start travel to the Emerald City. They hop e to find a more plentiful place to live, on the way they stop at a house to rest and then a brand new adventure begins. Read the book to find out just what happens next to these new characters and how they meet the patchwork girl. I liked reading this book; I thought the author had several In this story it tells of a boy and his uncle that live in a secluded area in the land of Oz. They are very poor and there land is not supporting them enough, so they start travel to the Emerald City. They hop e to find a more plentiful place to live, on the way they stop at a house to rest and then a brand new adventure begins. Read the book to find out just what happens next to these new characters and how they meet the patchwork girl. I liked reading this book; I thought the author had several funny things that he added to it. It made a good story to read as the series continues on.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard Knight

    This book starts off well, but the latter half after the new crew leaves the Emerald City is like all the previous books. Meet new residents of Oz, toss in some puns, and a deus ex machina conclusion for good measure. There are also two instances where I feel like the author forgot the narrative thread they were going for, and then just said, screw it. Let's keep moving. Some fun moments to be sure, but the second half could have been better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ottery StCatchpole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What is there to say about the 7th book in the Oz series, that hasn't already been said? Probably a lot as these books, as dear as they are to me, have never been popular outside of a few thousand readers in the states I suppose. I'm sure people have heard of them, and come across them but did you know there are over 40 some Oz books written by different writers? L. Frank Baum only wrote the first 13 or so, and then he appointed someone else to take over for him and while a lot of these books a What is there to say about the 7th book in the Oz series, that hasn't already been said? Probably a lot as these books, as dear as they are to me, have never been popular outside of a few thousand readers in the states I suppose. I'm sure people have heard of them, and come across them but did you know there are over 40 some Oz books written by different writers? L. Frank Baum only wrote the first 13 or so, and then he appointed someone else to take over for him and while a lot of these books are still in print, no small thanks to Books of Wonder's reprints, and Del Rey's trade paperbacks, they are not exactly flying off the shelves. I don't think I've ever found them at a bookstore I frequent and I frequent many bookstores. The exception being Half Price books where I occasionally find them in the rare books section. But onto the review. Sadly, the books have never been as popular as the 1939 film version, and while everyone on the planet has probably seen that movie and knows it was based on a book, I doubt very many know that Dorothy's adventures continued afterwards. I discovered these books when I was a kid, at the local library, where the beautiful illustrations of John R. Neill caught my attention and the wonderful, whimsical, writing of L. Frank Baum captured and still owns my heart. By now I'm sure you've realized this is a good review. I loved the books back then, when as a child I read them and marveled at the wonder of 'modern' fairy tales. These stories being less than a hundred years at the time I was reading them, and far younger as fairy tales go than Alice in Wonderland and the books of the Brothers Grimm. I found the stories delightful because they had more modern ideas and they weren't as medieval as the Grimm stories or those of Perrault which I had searched out as well. Somehow or other though, L. Frank Baum managed to keep the books from growing boring, despite the fact that the stories all take place in Oz, and the magical fairy land has borders and four countries. Every book is a delight and The Patchwork Girl of Oz is no different because like all the other books it introduced us to new characters, in this case Scraps, the patchwork girl, Ojo the Unlucky, a delightful if somewhat mischievous boy hero, and the glass cat. Having read other Oz books by Baum its easy to spot his soft spot for female protagonists, and I'm not surprised to find that a large cadre of the more important characters in the book are women or young girls, so it was nice for a change to see a young male protagonist in the series take on a quest. Half way through the book however, like in other Oz books, we find ourselves back in the company of familiar friends: Dorthy, Ozma, the scarecrow and Nick Chopper the tin woodsman. It is, in my opinion, one of the better pleasures of reading the Oz books in that we are always coming back to our old dear friends, who all live close by to the royal palace or somewhere in Oz. The book too contains some quaint philosophical meanderings which I'm sure my young mind would have missed, but nothing that burdens the story or becomes too self-reflective, and a lot of fun puns, which I sometimes caught as a kid and I still find cute now that I'm grown. All in all it was a wonderful trek back to Oz and to familiar characters, a book that doesn't need to be read in the order it was meant (this is book 7), but which you would do good to read after having come to it from the other six. I love Scraps, Ojo, and the glass cat and I can't wait to read their further adventures as I trek through the other Oz books. A marvelous book for boys or girls of any age. Full of innocence and whimsy like you don't see too often outside of great classics like this, Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan. I heartily recommend this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    This is the second book involving Baum's Oz book series that I've read so far, so needless to say, I am reading the books out of order. Not that that matters overmuch, since the plots of each of the books tie up nicely at the end of each and aren't mentioned in the next. If anything needs to be known, it is quickly summarized and then they move on. I wish more authors would do this - it would save me a lot of headaches. As for the characters, I liked Ojo from the start, even though he sorely nee This is the second book involving Baum's Oz book series that I've read so far, so needless to say, I am reading the books out of order. Not that that matters overmuch, since the plots of each of the books tie up nicely at the end of each and aren't mentioned in the next. If anything needs to be known, it is quickly summarized and then they move on. I wish more authors would do this - it would save me a lot of headaches. As for the characters, I liked Ojo from the start, even though he sorely needed a confidence booster. Apparently other characters needed to be made more humble. More on that later. The Woozy was kind of useless. The Patchwork Girl herself needed to grow on me, by the end of it I liked her the most and now I'm a Scarecrow/Patchwork shipper. (Does anyone get the feeling that the Tin Woodsman is gay? Oh, just me, nevermind.) One character wasn't explained though: What was with the Mysterious House with its disembodied voice and free bed-and-breakfast deal? ***SPOILER ALERT*** You have been warned (I didn't feel like blocking half of my review). While I enjoyed this book, I can see how easy it was for Gregory Maguire to turn the rulers of Oz into despotic dictators. I mean, it's a fairyland but no one is allowed to use magic?! That's awful, I thought that was the point of living in a fairyland. And nearly all of Ozma's friends were produced by magical means, so I don't understand how she could hold such a grudge towards it, even with the awful witch who enslaved her and turned her into a boy. (On that note: Why didn't she stay that way?! She could pee standing up - men will never know how much more free they are because of that slight advantage. I mean, think about it - they can go anywhere, they can make it fun by aiming at stuff, and they're done so quickly! Although they need to wash their hands more - don't think for a minute that no one noticed you guys don't wash your hands! Ewww!) I'm glad they fixed the Crooked Magician's extreme Rheumatoid Arthritis, but they had to give him something after taking all of his magic away. And it wasn't like he was a bad man with it, or just crap at it, he was doing amazing stuff! Everyone liked his creations: the Patchwork Girl was some much needed sass next to Ojo's downtrodden behavior and the Glass Cat was pretty if not really useful and kind of annoying at times. He was dabbling with things like the Powder of Life! That has to be difficult to make, even for one who is used to practicing magic. Ozma could have used him is all I'm saying. And then they took the Glass Cat's pink brains out so she would be more humble. How terrible! Instead of waiting for her to mature into a better person(cat?) or develop humility on her own, they took away a physical characteristic of hers to suit their own needs. And since they went through the trouble of doing that, why didn't they 'fix' the poor Phonograph? His problem was easy, you just switch out his crappy record for a better one and everyone is happy. If I don't see him in the next book, then that means someone destroyed him for doing the one thing he was made to do and that was to try to entertain them, which is sad. Also, I love how Ozma is slowly putting all of the people she needs to keep an eye on very close by. But since this is a children's book, I'll keep a few of my 'conspiracy theories' and 'observations' to myself. And Glinda the Good is a bitch! She watched Ojo walk all over Oz to get all this stuff to fix his Uncle who he feared he wouldn't see alive again for at least six years, if ever, only to fail to get all of the items needed when she knew the whole time a simple way to fix his problem.... Oh, wait, that's how she rolls.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    It was apparent in the previous Oz book of the series that Baum had gotten to a place where he no longer wanted to tell stories about the land of Oz, so he tried to end the series, but he kept getting letters requesting further stories. The result of these numerous requests is that two years after "The Emerald City of Oz" Baum created this new book. This book feels far superior to the previous work only because it appears Baum has gotten to a peaceful place with telling these fantastical stories It was apparent in the previous Oz book of the series that Baum had gotten to a place where he no longer wanted to tell stories about the land of Oz, so he tried to end the series, but he kept getting letters requesting further stories. The result of these numerous requests is that two years after "The Emerald City of Oz" Baum created this new book. This book feels far superior to the previous work only because it appears Baum has gotten to a peaceful place with telling these fantastical stories. He is able to create characters again that are out of this world, but have a heart, which he was only somewhat able to do in the most recent volumes before this to some success. The only gripe about this book is that it is apparent that Baum does not have a love for music. In the previous volume there was a character that played music and he was ridiculed heavily and in this one a phonograph comes to life that is greatly hated by all that hear it. It feels again that Baum said that certain things do not deserve to be alive because they are so vastly different, which does not sit well with me in the slightest. Baum still even when being rude towards different people is able to create a wonderful adventure story where you are anticipating how you will get to the conclusion. The Patchwork Girl of Oz does not disappoint in this respect. You will wonder how they are ever going to get to the end of the book and how everything will be wrapped up in a nice ribbon for this is a children book and it must be wrapped in that ribbon. I was really taken in with his characterization of Scraps the Patchwork Girl of Oz in this particular story. At times she is described as crazy as she suddenly bursts into a rhyme, but this is one of his stronger characters. She is well-developed and thought-out. I am hoping that she appears in a few of the books that are in the rest of the series because she is one of Baum's better designs.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sergei Ter-Tumasov

    Все хуже и хуже!!! У L Frank Baum фантазии хватает только на придумывание всяких странных существ, а сюжет повторяется из книги в книгу! Давно бы перестал читать эту бездарную серию (бедные американские дети!!!), но моего знания английского, к сожалению, хватает только на детские книжки и книжки этой серии легко найти в интернете. Перечитал свою рецензию на предыдущую книгу, The Emerald City of Oz, впечатления совпали на 100%: " В начале показалось, что эта книга будет получше, чем предыдущие, но, Все хуже и хуже!!! У L Frank Baum фантазии хватает только на придумывание всяких странных существ, а сюжет повторяется из книги в книгу! Давно бы перестал читать эту бездарную серию (бедные американские дети!!!), но моего знания английского, к сожалению, хватает только на детские книжки и книжки этой серии легко найти в интернете. Перечитал свою рецензию на предыдущую книгу, The Emerald City of Oz, впечатления совпали на 100%: " В начале показалось, что эта книга будет получше, чем предыдущие, но, к сожалению, всего лишь показалось! Сюжет, практически, тот же самый, что и в других книгах серии: куда-то едут, по дороге встречают всевозможных странных типов (которые на основной сюжет вообще никак не влияют), приезжают в Изумрудный город, потом какое-то незначительное вторжение плохих существ, а потом все снова счастливы." За исключением вторжения плохих существ (в этот раз все хорошие и проблема, из-за которой начался весь сыр-бор, возникла по неосторожности) все справедливо и для The Patchwork Girl of Oz. И еще непонятно почему книга называется The Patchwork Girl of Oz ( на русский перевели как "Лоскутушка (!!!!!!!!!!) из страны Оз" (бедные русские дети!!!)), ведь она не является главным персонажем, а просто время от времени придумывает глупые стишки, которые всем действуют на нервы! Но, как ни странно, книга имела финансовый успех, поэтому автор продолжил свой нелегкий труд! Так что либо я повышаю свой уровень английского, либо придется читать еще целых 7 (!!!!) книг!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I very much enjoyed this Oz book. At first, I was not fond of the Patchwork Girl, but once her personality bloomed, I grew to love her. This time, Baum starts his readers with a new incredible adventure without the same monotonous motive. Baum also brought back many old characters (to my happiness, more of Jack Pumpkinhead!). There was also an incredible amount of humor and puns, a lot of it poking fun at real life, I'm sure. I loved the Phonograph, just like the Musicker from "The Road to Oz" and I very much enjoyed this Oz book. At first, I was not fond of the Patchwork Girl, but once her personality bloomed, I grew to love her. This time, Baum starts his readers with a new incredible adventure without the same monotonous motive. Baum also brought back many old characters (to my happiness, more of Jack Pumpkinhead!). There was also an incredible amount of humor and puns, a lot of it poking fun at real life, I'm sure. I loved the Phonograph, just like the Musicker from "The Road to Oz" and I was sad to see everyone hating him. I was also pleased to see that Baum cleared up my question about the witches that I had from "The Road to Oz" - at least, I think it has. I presume the position of "Wicked Witch of the East/West" is a position rather than a singular witch. I enjoyed all of the new characters. My last question revolves around the cats in Oz. Is it just me, or are all of the cats in the Oz books disagreeable and unlikable? The glass cat and Eureka (who is the pink cat they mention in this volume, right?) are not likable characters in my opinion. I was also surprised that Baum mentioned the pink cat once and then never brought her up again in this volume. Also, she came from Kansas, and was able to talk. Yet Dorothy claims Toto can't speak English because he's from Kansas. Another discrepancy on Baum's part, hm? I wonder why Glinda isn't the ruler of Oz, since she is obviously more powerful than everyone else! I also realized that Baum never explained the origins or purpose of the mysterious house. Baum usually gives his readers a good description and history of his new, wonderful characters, but the house and its invisible voice are never explained. I wonder why.

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