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More Than You Can Chew PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: More Than You Can Chew
Author: Marnelle Tokio
Publisher: Published October 28th 2003 by Tundra Books (first published October 1st 2003)
ISBN: 9780887766398
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

714627.More_Than_You_Can_Chew.pdf

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Marty Black has retreated from a difficult family situation into the area she can best control, her own appetites. She may not be able to control her parents’ behavior, but she can decide what she will and will not eat. Eventually, she stops eating altogether. Marty is close to death when she finally asks for help and finds herself in a psychiatric institution. But recogni Marty Black has retreated from a difficult family situation into the area she can best control, her own appetites. She may not be able to control her parents’ behavior, but she can decide what she will and will not eat. Eventually, she stops eating altogether. Marty is close to death when she finally asks for help and finds herself in a psychiatric institution. But recognizing her need for help is only the first tenuous step on a long road to recovery.Marty’s ability to find a way to live, despite the powerful lure of anorexia, is the core of this fine, insightful novel.Marnelle Tokio’s semi autobiographical story will resonate with every teenager who faces issues of family, body image, and self-confidence.

30 review for More Than You Can Chew

  1. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Marty is anorexic. She’s been sent to an institution to deal with that, because she’s dangerously underweight. What starts it? Everything, nothing, feeling like things are spiraling out of control, having her then boyfriend tell her she’s a fat slut when he finds out she’s not a virgin. So many things. Her mother is a recovering alcoholic when Marty gets her own lockup therapy. Her dad is so far removed and so distant and so disconnected that he’s like a bad dream. Still, he’s dad, and Marty wan Marty is anorexic. She’s been sent to an institution to deal with that, because she’s dangerously underweight. What starts it? Everything, nothing, feeling like things are spiraling out of control, having her then boyfriend tell her she’s a fat slut when he finds out she’s not a virgin. So many things. Her mother is a recovering alcoholic when Marty gets her own lockup therapy. Her dad is so far removed and so distant and so disconnected that he’s like a bad dream. Still, he’s dad, and Marty wants so much (though she’d never, never admit it to anyone) for him to be part of her life and actually care about her. There’s lots here about anorexia and what that’s like, but it’s also character driven. Marty has such strength and she’s fighting against all of the pain inside of her. When she talks about her anorexia it’s not always the “thin is beautiful” kind of stuff that you often hear, but more “control is beautiful” - here is this one thing I can do phenomenally well, and so I do it, because everything else is falling apart; I do it even if this thing that I do will eventually kill me. She gradually comes out of this obsession, at least to the point of being able to connect with and mentor some of the other girls on her ward. She’s a big pain in the ass to the adults around her, but she’s so gentle with younger kids. She's got the potential to save herself if she can focus her rage, control, and talent on someone or something else (and not on self-destruction). Around Christmas, she’s home for the holidays and things are pretty bad. Mom and dad are awful to one another, the ex boyfriend makes an appearance, and Lily, her friend in the institution, dies while she’s away. Marty can’t handle it and tries to commit suicide. She fails, much to everyone’s relief (even her own). And somehow this act of desperation gives her all kinds of courage to face the things in her life that are really messed up. So, gradually, she starts to get better, and she makes it back to the outside where she really has to concentrate to live “normally,” but we end on a hopeful note. This is described as an “autobiographical novel.” It’s an excellent read. Marty is so strong, despite being all bent and prickly and curled in tightly around her tiny tiny shrunken stomach, protecting herself. Gradually, she opens up and finds and rebuilds her former confidence – discovering that she has what it takes to work for her own recovery. I think we all have this fragility to some extent; there's always the danger of falling apart.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steph Furlan

    Welcome to Silver Lake Hospital. The alcoholics are sobering up. The druggies are getting clean. The crazies can have all the drugs they want. The bulimics wish they had more food. The anorexics have all the food they need, but they would rather starve. In the eating disorder unit, one of the inmates is smart-mouthed, unapologetic, yet broken, Marty Black. In More Than You Can Chew, we learn that Marty’s parents are divorced. Her mother is an alcoholic. Her father is a work-a-holic. Her boyfriend brea Welcome to Silver Lake Hospital. The alcoholics are sobering up. The druggies are getting clean. The crazies can have all the drugs they want. The bulimics wish they had more food. The anorexics have all the food they need, but they would rather starve. In the eating disorder unit, one of the inmates is smart-mouthed, unapologetic, yet broken, Marty Black. In More Than You Can Chew, we learn that Marty’s parents are divorced. Her mother is an alcoholic. Her father is a work-a-holic. Her boyfriend breaks up with her. As her world crumbles around her, she finds one way to regain control in her life – she chooses not to eat. Complete Review: http://feistylittlewoman.wordpress.co...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anna Francesca

    (Note: This is categorized as a novel but says on the back cover that is is semi-autobiographical. It seems, based on some of the details of the text, to be more reality than fiction but told with artistic license). This fell into the genre of books about the experience inside a psychiatric hospital (such as Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen, Impulse by Ellen Hopkins, and Cut by Patricia McCormick, to name a few). Maybe I’ve just read too many books on the topic and have tired of it, or maybe i (Note: This is categorized as a novel but says on the back cover that is is semi-autobiographical. It seems, based on some of the details of the text, to be more reality than fiction but told with artistic license). This fell into the genre of books about the experience inside a psychiatric hospital (such as Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen, Impulse by Ellen Hopkins, and Cut by Patricia McCormick, to name a few). Maybe I’ve just read too many books on the topic and have tired of it, or maybe it has been done better. Marty’s relationships with her parents felt forced. I didn’t dislike this book as much as I feel that something was missing. I was expecting more from it. Marty’s voice is real and engagingly snarky. It definitely resounded with teenage verbal-rebellion. Still, if someone is seeking this sort of book, I’d suggest Girl, Interrupted in lieu of this one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miss Bookiverse

    Ich habe Nichts leichter als das wirklich gern gelesen. Es hat einen sehr flüssigen Schreibstil und die Kapitel sind kurz und episodenartig. Außerdem finde ich das Thema Essstörung immer wieder interessant. Dennoch ist das Buch alles andere als perfekt. Ich vermute manches liegt an der deutschen Übersetzung. Einige Dialoge kamen mir nicht stimmig vor, sie wirkten gestelzt oder übertrieben jugendlich. Charaktere haben ab und zu Sachen erzählt, die mir als Leser zwar mehr Informationen gegeben habe Ich habe Nichts leichter als das wirklich gern gelesen. Es hat einen sehr flüssigen Schreibstil und die Kapitel sind kurz und episodenartig. Außerdem finde ich das Thema Essstörung immer wieder interessant. Dennoch ist das Buch alles andere als perfekt. Ich vermute manches liegt an der deutschen Übersetzung. Einige Dialoge kamen mir nicht stimmig vor, sie wirkten gestelzt oder übertrieben jugendlich. Charaktere haben ab und zu Sachen erzählt, die mir als Leser zwar mehr Informationen gegeben haben, die im Gespräch aber fehl am Platz wirkten. Am Schriftbild hat mich irritiert, dass Martys Gedanken extra kursiv gedruckt wurden, obwohl die ganze Geschichte sowieso aus ihrer Sicht geschrieben ist. Mein größtes Problem mit dem Roman war, dass ich Marty nie als essgestört empfunden habe. Laut einem Interview beruht Nichts leichter als das auf eigenen Erfahrungen der Autorin, aber in Martys Leben scheint (Nicht-)Essen gar keine so große Rolle zu spielen. Ab und zu weigert sie sich zu essen, übergibt sich oder hat eine Panikattacke, weil sie zugenommen hat, aber die Problematik wirkte immer nur eingestreut. In Büchern wie Wintergirls habe ich das anders kennen gelernt, da beherrscht die Krankheit den gesamten Alltag. Über Martys Eltern habe ich mich am meisten geärgert. Sie geben so abstruse Sachen von sich, dass ich mir oft nicht sicher war, ob ihre Reaktionen realistisch sind. Hoffen wir mal, dass Eltern im wahren Leben einfühlsamer vorgehen.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marina

    this book was really tough. I think it's important to mention that this book does not really focus on the eating disorder itself. It is the main topic, yes, but the story deals with so much more than that. I thought the main character was really bratty and sometimes even unbelievable, but I take that back, I can see why she treated all the people around her like that. What I liked the most is the humour. Marty always gives witty/ironic responses and makes fun of her own illness, which is somethi this book was really tough. I think it's important to mention that this book does not really focus on the eating disorder itself. It is the main topic, yes, but the story deals with so much more than that. I thought the main character was really bratty and sometimes even unbelievable, but I take that back, I can see why she treated all the people around her like that. What I liked the most is the humour. Marty always gives witty/ironic responses and makes fun of her own illness, which is something that you rarely find in books dealing with eating disorders. What you will NOT find is a "reason" for the development of the disorder (which reflects reality), you will not find a "gradual progress" in both the disorder and in recovery. There is one chapter "before" the eating disorder, immediately followed by a chapter in a clinic, which is where the remaining 99% of the story takes place, too. The actual struggle with food is just "a side story". But it's okay, as eating disorders are in most cases a manifestation of something much bigger rather than "just a problem with food". With Marty, there could be tons of different reasons and triggers, but it's never really mentioned. I think this "lack of answers", the lack of "simplicity" makes this book really honest.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M

    In my own opinion, this book was so well written and really looked into the eyes of a teenage girl from their perspective. Also, I read a comment from another reader about how in the novel, two other important characters (Chris, 18 year old boy and Lily, 8 year old girl) are as well affected by anorexia. I soon realized that by the author doing that, she wasn't focusing on just teenage girls but breaking that stereotype and making every see that it can happen to anyone such as boys and young kid In my own opinion, this book was so well written and really looked into the eyes of a teenage girl from their perspective. Also, I read a comment from another reader about how in the novel, two other important characters (Chris, 18 year old boy and Lily, 8 year old girl) are as well affected by anorexia. I soon realized that by the author doing that, she wasn't focusing on just teenage girls but breaking that stereotype and making every see that it can happen to anyone such as boys and young kids. The author did a terrific job in writing this job and portrayed the character Marty very well and realistically so readers could connect with her on a whole other level and empathize the struggles and pains she goes through. Even though the main focus is anorexia, other problems are addressed which readers see and immediately connect and relate with the protagonist.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Manshui

    This book is about a girl with anorexic who's being sent to a camp where the nurses took away all her diet food and pills. However, she wasn't alone and eating food was a problem for these people with anorexic. Having to reject eating food made the nurse force them to eat by using tubes and drinking liquid food instead. Also, the main character's mom is still trying to help her daughter by bringing all the paper work to graduate high school but "dead girls don't graduate." Teenagers of many kind This book is about a girl with anorexic who's being sent to a camp where the nurses took away all her diet food and pills. However, she wasn't alone and eating food was a problem for these people with anorexic. Having to reject eating food made the nurse force them to eat by using tubes and drinking liquid food instead. Also, the main character's mom is still trying to help her daughter by bringing all the paper work to graduate high school but "dead girls don't graduate." Teenagers of many kinds should read this book because this book shows one of many problems that we all face. This book can be connected to the world to people who are suffering with anorexic or eating disorder to relationship problems.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    More Than You Can Chew is a poignant book of battles and freedom. Marty wishes she could go back home, but that’s impossible when she has an eating disorder and is taken to a clinic till she recovers, her mother is an alcoholic, and her father doesn’t seem to care about her. In the clinic, Marty begins her journey to recover from her eating disorder, and begins bonding with the other girls there, and Marty begins to realize maybe she does want to get better, but can she break from her disorder a More Than You Can Chew is a poignant book of battles and freedom. Marty wishes she could go back home, but that’s impossible when she has an eating disorder and is taken to a clinic till she recovers, her mother is an alcoholic, and her father doesn’t seem to care about her. In the clinic, Marty begins her journey to recover from her eating disorder, and begins bonding with the other girls there, and Marty begins to realize maybe she does want to get better, but can she break from her disorder and get her life back?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    An anorexic, or a bulemic, the author never did get around to saying what, exactly she was. But it was what I'd wanted to read, and I most ceretainly enjoyed reading it. It was the first book to make me cry in months. I loved the way Marty was so sarcastic, she seemed more real than alot of the charaters in books i have read lately. But Lily, poor, poor Lily. She was by far the sadddest part to the book. I laughed, I cried, I'm glad I read the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    This novel was the author's semi-autobiographical work on being in recovery for an eating disorder. It kept my interest, but it wasn't a particularly original take on eating disorders. Two characters were pivotal to the story; an 8 year old suffering from anorexia, as well as a young man, both on the brink of death. This helped to move the stereotype away from teenage girls.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Sullivan

    This book was one that I could truly empathize with as i tore through each page, however I do not recommend this book to those either uneducated on the subject of eating disorders, or those faint hearted. Be prepared to soak the pages of this novel in tears as you read More Than You Can Chew.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    This was an excellent book about a girl who has issues with food who is taken from school and put into a special section at the hospital. Part autobographical, this is a moving story that helps people undertand eating disorders.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily Witte

    This book gave me an inside look at the mind of an anorexic. It really opens your eyes to the severity of the situation and how important it is to get help, but it also opens your eyes to the institution's idea of helping them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    I think this is the most light-hearted book featuring a person with anorexia I ever read. It's a quick read, "fun" and not really informative or profound, but i didn't think that was the authors intention anyway, so I guess that's okay.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I'm such a sucker for a good problem novel....

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    I'm gonna read the rest of it as soon as I've finished "The Jane Austen Book Club".

  17. 4 out of 5

    Miharu Rokujou

    when i first started reading it i didnt like it that much, but later into the book it started getting better and the ending was definitely a tear jerker lol

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shawni

    I have re-read this book so many times and I absolutely love it. There is something about it that just seems so very real.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ruthie

    anorexia through the eyes of a teenager - very disturbing, but insightful and well written.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Lucky

    This was one of those books that no Matter how many pages I read it still felt like I was getting no where!! The comic relief is the only reason I'm giving it 2 stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Myss-Syckness

    Pretty much the best book about eating disorders, it's got enough drama to keep you reading until it's done. I really liked it. I wonder why it's not on more lists...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam - Spines in a Line

    showing the dangers of eating disorders with a likeable character and compelling narrative. Great job by the editor

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book was one of those books that brings out emotion. You laugh out loud at some things, but want to cry at so many points.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raiyana

    This triggered me but helped me as well :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Really powerful book about eating disorders. Almost but now quite as good as Hunger Point which deals with the same issues.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    More Than You Can Chew is one of the best eating disorder books I've read before. Its real. Its not fake. It doesn't sugar coat anything like some other books do.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie A.

    An OK look at rehab, but not triggery enough to be a good anorexia novel. I like them better when they inspire me to count calories and portion control for a few days.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    it was okay but hard to follow

  29. 5 out of 5

    Khadija

    This book is really good and I think it's going to help me with my assignment!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kiri

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